Catullus


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Catullus

(Caius Valerius Catullus) (kətŭl`əs), 84? B.C.–54? B.C., Roman poet, b. Verona. Of a well-to-do family, he went c.62 B.C. to Rome. He fell deeply in love, probably with Clodia, sister of Cicero's opponent Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband. Catullus wrote to his beloved, addressed as Lesbia (to recall Sappho of Lesbos), a series of superb little poems that run from early passion and tenderness to the hatred and disillusionment that overwhelmed him after his mistress was faithless. Of the 116 extant poems attributed to him, three (18–20) are almost certainly spurious. They include, besides the Lesbia poems, poems to his young friend Juventius; epigrams, ranging from the genial to the obscenely derisive; elegies; a few long poems, notably "Attis" and a nuptial poem honoring Thetis and Peleus; and various short pieces. His satire is vigorous and flexible, his light poems joyful and full-bodied. He was influenced by the Alexandrians and drew much on the Greeks for form and meter, but his genius outran all models. Catullus is one of the greatest lyric poets of all time. Two of his most popular poems are the 10-line poem, touching and simple, which ends, "frater ave atque vale" [hail, brother, and farewell], and "On the Death of Lesbia's Sparrow."

Bibliography

See translations by R. Myers and R. J. Ormsby (1970), C. Martin (1990), and P. Green (2005); studies by A. L. Wheeler (1934, repr. 1964), T. Frank (1928, repr. 1965), K. Quinn (1959, 1970, and 1972), R. Jenkyns (1982), T. P. Wiseman (1985), J. Ferguson (1988), and C. Martin (1992).

Catullus

Gaius Valerius . ?84--?54 bc, Roman lyric poet, noted particularly for his love poems
References in periodicals archive ?
63 is, for the modern reader, perhaps the least accessible of all of Catullus's poems.
This crude image is then followed by pathos: Catullus' love is described as a flower that grew at the edge of a meadow, and which was cruelly and needlessly cut down by a passing plough (11.21-24).
Lawrence's essay, which--I agree--surely must have been in James Wright's memory when he wrote the prose poem "A Small Grove." Quite a few of Wright's prose poems are steeped in his love of Catullus's writings, and therefore I mistakenly ascribed the phrase "candles of darkness" to Catullus.
Since the Italian Renaissance, when first this suggestion was made by Angelo Poliziano and followed by the Dutch scholar Isaac Voss in 1684, some scholars have maintained that Catullus' passer is in fact his penis.
"Say Goodbye Catullus" was not his last work by any means, but it did seem to afford him release from anxiety and melancholy.
Tennyson indicates the potential uncanniness of an imported Greek or Latin meter when he playfully refers to his own "Hendecasyllabics" as a "metrification of Catullus." The poem was included in a section of Enoch Arden subtitled "Experiments in Quantity," but was first published in 1863 in The Cornhill Magazine.
I had 22 World of Warcraft characters, and invested more than 700 hours of my own existence in each of two of them, Maxrohn and Catullus. Maxrohn, a human priest, was named after my uncle, Max Rohn, who was an Episcopal priest and something of an adventurer; he once taught me a judo move that could break a man's arm.
For example the love poet Catullus writes to his ladylove, "I hate and I love.
(5) A possible early analogue, however, incorporating these lines and including a very similar progression of thought, appears in Poem 8 of the first-century BCE Roman poet Catullus.
For example, when Pomeroy imagines Regilla's wedding, she acknowledges the lack of information about such ceremonies in the early Empire, but reasonably supposes that conservative Romans would have preserved those of the past, for which there is evidence of a sort--from a poem by Catullus. Some may find a related stylistic device in the book disturbing.
He had been reading the poems of Catullus and felt he had sunk to a