Catulus

Catulus

(kăch`o͝oləs), family of ancient Rome, of the Lutatian gens. Caius Lutatius Catulus was consul in 242 B.C. He won the great Roman naval victory over Carthage off the Aegates (modern Aegadian Isles) that ended the First Punic War. Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. 87 B.C., was consul in 102 B.C. His colleague in the consulship was MariusMarius, Caius
, c.157 B.C.–86 B.C., Roman general. A plebeian, he became tribune (119 B.C.) and praetor (115 B.C.) and was seven times consul. He served under Scipio Africanus Minor at Numantia and under Quintus Metellus against Jugurtha.
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, with whom he went north to oppose a Germanic invasion. He had to retreat before the Cimbri until Marius returned from Gaul. The two then defeated the Cimbri near Vercelli in 101 B.C. He later opposed Marius in the Social War and favored Sulla. Proscribed by the Marians, he either committed suicide or was killed. He was the patron of a literary circle and was himself a writer and a philosopher. Cicero praises his oratory. His son, also Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. c.60 B.C., was consul in 78 B.C. He opposed the constitutional changes sought by Marcus Lepidus (d. 77 B.C.; see under LepidusLepidus
, family of the ancient Roman patrician gens Aemilia. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, d. 152 B.C., was a consul in 187 and 175 B.C., a censor in 179 B.C., and pontifex maximus [high priest] from 180 B.C.
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), and when Lepidus led a revolt, Catulus and Pompey defeated him. Catulus was censor in 65 B.C. He was the leader of the archconservative group. He led the minority opposing the conferring of unusual powers on Pompey by the Manilian Law in 66 B.C., and he was one of the bitterest opponents of Julius Caesar.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) "nec catulus, partu quern reddidit ursa recenti, / sed male viva cam est; lambendo mater in artus / fingit et in formam, quantam capit ipse, reducit" Ovid, Metamorphoses, trans.
He declared, "It appears, that Catulus, Cato, Cicero, and the wisest of the Roman patriots, and perhaps wiser never lived, kept on, like infatuated federalists, hoping to the last, that the people would see their error and return to the safe old past." (78) Unfortunately for Ames, his declining health prevented him from keeping on like his ancient heroes.
A second relevant passage can be found in De Oratore 2.154, where Catulus responds to Antonius, "Really, ...
(49) Kelly, B., "The Law that Catulus Passed," in Roman Crossings: Theory and Practice in the Roman Republic edited by K.
Esta especie tambien es conocida por los siguientes sinonimos: Cypraea vinosa, Cypraea obtusa, Cypraea catulus y Phanteriana pantherina (Allan, 1956).
Catulus, [ex] dec(urione) pro[mo]tus [..., (centurio) leg(ionis)] III Aug(ustae), est date de 174.
(37) From Varro's instructions, it seems reasonable to assume that this custom had existed for long enough for Varro to recognise that the presiding officer did not have to call on a particular consular extra ordinem (for instance, Catulus), but had a free choice from among the consulars.