Catulus

Catulus

(kăch`o͝oləs), family of ancient Rome, of the Lutatian gens. Caius Lutatius Catulus was consul in 242 B.C. He won the great Roman naval victory over Carthage off the Aegates (modern Aegadian Isles) that ended the First Punic War. Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. 87 B.C., was consul in 102 B.C. His colleague in the consulship was MariusMarius, Caius
, c.157 B.C.–86 B.C., Roman general. A plebeian, he became tribune (119 B.C.) and praetor (115 B.C.) and was seven times consul. He served under Scipio Africanus Minor at Numantia and under Quintus Metellus against Jugurtha.
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, with whom he went north to oppose a Germanic invasion. He had to retreat before the Cimbri until Marius returned from Gaul. The two then defeated the Cimbri near Vercelli in 101 B.C. He later opposed Marius in the Social War and favored Sulla. Proscribed by the Marians, he either committed suicide or was killed. He was the patron of a literary circle and was himself a writer and a philosopher. Cicero praises his oratory. His son, also Quintus Lutatius Catulus, d. c.60 B.C., was consul in 78 B.C. He opposed the constitutional changes sought by Marcus Lepidus (d. 77 B.C.; see under LepidusLepidus
, family of the ancient Roman patrician gens Aemilia. Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, d. 152 B.C., was a consul in 187 and 175 B.C., a censor in 179 B.C., and pontifex maximus [high priest] from 180 B.C.
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), and when Lepidus led a revolt, Catulus and Pompey defeated him. Catulus was censor in 65 B.C. He was the leader of the archconservative group. He led the minority opposing the conferring of unusual powers on Pompey by the Manilian Law in 66 B.C., and he was one of the bitterest opponents of Julius Caesar.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Law that Catulus Passed," in Roman Crossings: Theory and Practice in the Roman Republic edited by K.
Poiche i frammenti delle Communes Historiae o Communis Historia sono tutti citati sotto il nome di Lutatius, mentre Lutatius Catulus e generalmente noto sotto il nome di Catulus, si e anche pensato che l'autore non fosse il famoso console collega di Mario, ma il liberto Lutatius Daphnis (cf.
Collectors and antiquarians existed throughout the Middle Ages; Catulus, Horace and the Verrines by Cicero provide us with portraits of collectors, giving us an appreciation of their role in the ancient Roman and Greek worlds, particularly during the Hellenistic period.
Esta especie tambien es conocida por los siguientes sinonimos: Cypraea vinosa, Cypraea obtusa, Cypraea catulus y Phanteriana pantherina (Allan, 1956).
meo no[m(ine)], Catulus, (centurio) leg(ionis) III Aug(ustae).
Several men from 70 onwards are described as leaders of the senate in our sources, but it can be seen in almost all these cases that the phrase is used as a compliment, rather than a technical expression: it is so used of men such as Catulus, Servilius Vatia and Cicero.
Lysiteles catulus Simon 1895, by original designation.
The long tradition of erotic poetry, descended from Ovid, Catulus, Petronius and others "se incorpora a la produccion de los escritores dieciochescos" according to Ribao Pereira, and along with French influence, accounts for works such as El jardin de Venus (203).
Catulus poetry shows a coincidence of unmatched and irascible passions, which can be seen specially in the polimetric poems, as well as in the epigrams, but not in the Carmina Longiora, granting that they reflect ah expert and well balanced Catulus.
A study of the actual origins of Latin epistolography would, if one were to undertake such a project, examine the testimonia for letters by, inter alios, Scipio Africanus, Catulus, Cato the Censor, and Cornelia; it might discuss the influence of various Greek letter collections, including those of Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Epicurus.
I'll come home to you; Crassus would not ha' you To speak to him 'fore Quintus Catulus.