Caughnawaga


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Caughnawaga

(kä`nəwä'gə), community and Native American reserve, S Que., Canada, on the Saint Lawrence River opposite Lachine. It was founded (1676) as a refuge for Iroquois converts to the Christian faith.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also included in this section is a selection of portraits and views relating to the Kahnawake (Caughnawaga) Mohawks of Quebec, Canada, including a card bearing an artist's interpretation of the recently canonized Algonquin-Mohawk saint, Kateri Tekakwitha, famed Lily of the Mohawks.
(27) Anonymous, "At Caughnawaga, P.Q.," The Catholic World, A Monthly Magazine of General Literature and Science no.
For discussion of the treaty, see JR Miller, Compact, supra note 61 at 74-75; R v Cote, [1996] 3 SCR 139, 38 DLR (4th) 385 [Cote cited to SCR], The treaty right claim was based on a 1760 treaty at Swegatchy and Caughnawaga between the Algonquins and the British.
Jenness on his investigation at Caughnawaga Reserve re: disappearance of Mr F.W.
For over 50 years, the Kahnawake Mohawks of Quebec, Canada occupied a 10 square block hub in the North Gowanus section of Brooklyn, which became known as Little Caughnawaga. The men, skilled ironworkers, came to New York in search of work and brought their wives, children and often, extended family with them.
In DeCou's fields, to the east, a large party of Caughnawaga (Kahnawake) natives were encamped under the command of Captain Dominique Ducharme.
The family abandoned their village and built a new settlement, called Caughnawaga, some five miles away on the north bank of the Mohawk River, which today is in Fonda, New York.
Both names were also commonly rendered as Caughnawaga; each was used as an ethnonym as well as a toponym.
According to the semi-centennial program, "Lovers of Canada's National Game will have an opportunity of seeing a warm struggle between the whites and the aborigines, when the Torontos cross sticks with the Royal Team of Caughnawaga Indians, at the Rosedale Grounds.
Ignace, being a bit suspicious of the Presbyterians, tried to tell the chief that Gray and the others were not true Black Robes, since the ones he knew in Caughnawaga and in St.
Francis Xavier, a settlement of Indians in Canada, also named Caughnawaga (Kahnawake, Quebec) populated by Mohawk people who were much more accepting of Christianity.