speleothem

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speleothem

[′spē·lē·ə‚them]
(geology)
A secondary mineral deposited in a cave by the action of water. Also known as cave formation.
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of beautiful cave formations are present inside the
However, although these geochemical processes play a major role in cave formations, studies have shown that microbial activities also contribute to cave shaping (2,10-14).
In order to give the restaurant the look and feel of an actual cave, ex- perienced engineers explored the cave formations in different parts of the world, including the popular Al Hoota Caves in the Sultanate
A total of 5kms passageway has been mapped.<br/><br/>Tourists are awestruck to see the wonder of nature that surpasses human creativity.<br/><br/>A profusion of splendid cave formations, technically known as speleothems, are seen throughout the length and breadth of the cave.
"These cave formations take millions of years to form," she says.
Visitors underground can marvel at limestone cave formations and 330 million year-old fossils.
It is one of the richest provinces in the country in terms of underground cave formations. Cehennemaz (Hell's Mouth) Caves, which is considered as one of the gateways to the mythological Kingdom of the Underworld of Hades is a must-see along with a Gkgl Cave located on the Ankara highway.
Kartchner Caverns State Park, located 50 miles southeast of Tucson, was discovered more than 30 years ago and contains some of the world's most spectacular and colorful cave formations. Much of the cave remains undeveloped, and visitors can still see the discoverers' trek through the mud flats.
In the Forbidden City in Peking, the emperor's private garden prominently features cave formations. In one part of the garden, there is a small hill with grottos built of cave formations as well as a display of beautiful river-sculpted rocks.
Northup is braving harsh Villa Luz to study some slimy cave formations. Scientists think the cave may hold clues to what life on other planets might be like, if it exists.
The variety of rocks used to construct this desert igloo range from copper ore to cave formations. Now protected by law, the rocks can't be removed, which is ironic as a few of the rocks contain ancient petroglyphs collected before restrictions.