Cave of Mammon

Cave of Mammon

abode of god of riches. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Wealth
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.
"Sermon Parody and Discourses of the Flesh in Book II," originally published in Spenser Studies 7 (1987), examines several characters as preachers, including Mammon and Phaedria, and includes a persuasive reading of Guyon's much-discussed faint upon his emergence from the Cave of Mammon. "Reformation Continence and Spenserian Chastity in Book III" links the titular virtues of second and third book to find that "the distrust of eros not far beneath the surface of Reformation discourse on marr iage is much in evidence in this book's treatment of marriage and sexuality" (108).
This means that Guyon becomes a type of Christ testing himself in the wilderness, not a flawed hero, when he chooses to enter the Cave of Mammon and that his Destruction of the Bower of Bliss, far from being the show of repressed violence and intemperance that Stephen Greenblatt claimed, is actually mark of a temperate resistance to sensual temptation.
Guyon's faint at the end of the Cave of Mammon is 'simply the natural result of too quick an exposure to fresh air after three days in underground fumes' because the narrator does not tell us otherwise.