Cavell


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Cavell

Edith Louisa. 1865--1915, English nurse: executed by the Germans in World War I for helping Allied prisoners to escape
References in periodicals archive ?
This is how Cavell reads the passage just quoted from 'Self-Reliance.' Cities of Words, 24.
Rhu launches a fascinating examination of Stanley Cavell's work by focusing on three key areas: Shakespeare, Emerson, and Hollywood movies.
The first essay in this collection, 'Disowning Knowledge in King Lear,' was written in 1967 and published in 1969 as the culminating exemplification of the philosophical argument of Stanley Cavell's Must We Mean What We Say?1 It was subsequently republished in 1987, as the first essay of the original edition of Disowning Knowledge, Cavell's magisterial reading of Shakespeare's tragic drama.
In Reading Cavell's "The World Viewed": A Philosophical Perspective on Film, William Rothman and Marian Keane take on a number of film-critical tasks and obligations.
"Two paramedics attended at Cavell Gardens at 1.15pm, spoke to the accused, and he behaved in a threatening manner saying he was going to get people down to bash them."
The service, titled 'A Commemoration Service to Honour the Life and Legacy of Edith Cavell and Florence Nightingale', was organised by the Florence Nightingale Foundation and Cavell Nurses' Trust.
With locations in The Netherlands, the UK, Belgium, and Portugal, The Cavell Group offers research, consulting, professional services and training in SD-WAN, Cloud and mobility.
A memorial coin marking Cavell's life, and contemporary postcards documenting her brutal execution, will be auctioned alongside it.
At 11.15am Ian McArdle will give a talk on Edith Cavell.
Stanley Cavell, commenting on the "morning work" passage in Walden remarks, "At some stage, writing of this kind carries its weight with you or it does not" ("Night and Day: Heidegger and Thoreau").
FLANAGAN -EDITH CAVELL (NEE ROBERTS), October 31, 2016.
The Cavell Nurses' Trust's research findings have been branded "appalling" by the group's chairman Simon Knighton.