Cecco d'Ascoli


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Cecco d'Ascoli

(chĕk`kō däs`kōlē), 1269?–1327, Italian astrologer, mathematician, poet, and physician, whose real name was Francesco degli Stabili, b. Ascoli. A teacher of astrology at several institutions in Italy, he was professor of mathematics and astrology at the Univ. of Bologna (1322–24). He was denounced as heretical largely because, in defending astrology against Dante's attack on it in the Divine Comedy, Cecco himself had accused the great poet of heresy; he was burned at the stake. His chief work was L'acerba, an allegorical didactic poem of encyclopedic range.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(14) Se Cecco d'Ascoli ne L'Acerba descrive la tortora come "per see sola / vedova di compagna" (libro III, capitolo XXIII), il Fisiologo riassume le caratteristiche dell'animale nel modo seguente: "she loves her mate very much and lives chastely and faithfully with him, such that, if the male happens to be captured by a hawk or fowler, she does not take another mate but, rather, longs for and awaits her lost one at every moment and endures thus in remembrance and longing for him until death" (libro XXVIII).
This new re-proposal of a text that is as significant as it is overlooked follows on the heels of Albertazzi's similar edition of Cecco d'Ascoli's Acerba, which he published in 2002, likewise with La Finestra, and his slim but quite useful Enciclopedie medievali: storia e stile di un genere (La Finestra, 2008), which is in some ways a thematic companion piece to both these new editions.
Or poor Cecco d'Ascoli, burned at the stake in 1327 not by ordinary kindling, but by the flames of his own encyclopedias?
Weill-Parot pursues these problems in al-Kindi, Guillaume d'Auvergne, Albertus Magnus, Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, and then more briefly in Matteo d'Aquasparta, John Peckham, Pierre d'Auvergne, Michael Scot, Cecco d'Ascoli, John of Eschenden, Leopoldus of Austria, Taddeo da Parma, John of Saxe, Andreas de Sommaria, Nicole Oresme, Heinrich von Langenstein, Arnaud de Villeneuve, Pietro d'Abano, Guy de Chauliac, and various other fourteenth-century physicians.
Its author, Marco Albertazzi, produced an elegant edition of Cecco d'Ascoli's fourteenth-century Acerba (Trento: La Finestra, 2002).
Cecco d'Ascoli (an astrologer and astronomical poet burned at the stake for heresy in Florence in 1327) wrote a commentary on Alcabizio around 1324 (Boffito).
(25) Similarly, in his correspondence poem to Cecco d'Ascoli, Cecco, i' ti prego per virtu di quella (CXLVII), the quatrains present a request for advice based on his interlocutor's expertise (astrological rather than amorous), but exilic political material appears in the tercets.