ceiling effect


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ceiling effect

[′sēl·iŋ i‚fekt]
(psychology)
In testing, the actual limitation on a person's test score as the maximum score is approached or the limit on the performance of some task.
References in periodicals archive ?
It could be that there's a "ceiling effect," or a maximum point beyond which increased pain does not matter.
Rois has worked with colleagues Alex Faseruk, professor in the faculty of business administration at Memorial University, and Daphne Rixon, associate professor at the Sobey School of Business of Saint Mary's University, to write several papers examining the glass ceiling effect and how it applies to the church.
Moreover, we concluded that the developed model explains the glass ceiling effect on career progression, which is apparent from the regression equation mentioned below:
An advantage of buprenorphine is its low likelihood of overdose, due to the drug's so-called ceiling effect at a dosage of 24 mg/d;9 dosages above this amount have little increased medication effect.
The floor effect was 15.2% and 15.9%, and the ceiling effect was 14.5% and 13.0% for test and retest, respectively.
Vertical occupational segregation, often referred to as the glass ceiling effect, refers to the intangible, invisible barriers that prevent qualified women from attaining senior-level leadership positions and reaching their full potential within an organization (Knutson & Schmidgall, 1999; Kogovesek & Kogovesek, 2015; Schaap, 2008).
While the findings support the theory that Vitamin D may protect against the risk of cancer, there may be a ceiling effect, which may suggest that there are no additional benefits beyond a certain level of Vitamin D, Yamaji said.
"It's possible that a ceiling effect exists for those children that are exposed to continuous high levels of anxiety from pregnancy up to 5 years old," Blanca Bolea-Alamanac, PhD, said at the annual congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology.
Social support was selected as the moderator variable and incorporated into the theoretical framework so that its moderating effect can be evaluated against the glass ceiling effect on the women career advancement in the workforce.
Buprenorphine is a semisynthetic, partial mu-opioid receptor agonist that has theoretical safety and efficacy advantages over pure opioid agonists, through its proposed ceiling effect on respiratory depression but not analgesic effect [4].
It's a partial mu opioid agonist with a ceiling effect, so people using buprenorphine can't die from taking excessive amounts of it.
The benefits also continued at very high levels with no indication of a ceiling effect; people getting more than 750 minutes of brisk walking per week had a 36% reduction in risk of death.