Celaenae


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Celaenae

(sĭlē`nē), ancient city of Asia Minor, in Phrygia, near the source of the Maeander River, in present-day W central Turkey. In the days of the Persian Empire, Cyrus the Great had a palace there, and Xerxes I built a fort. Alexander the Great conquered the city in 333 B.C. Modern Dinar is on the site.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one myth, for instance, the ennead judged a contest between Apollo and Marsyas, and punished the loser-Marsyas, naturally, for even thinking he could beat a god--by flaying him alive in a cave near the river city of Celaenae.
In one myth, for instance, the ennead judged a contest between Apollo and Marsyas, and punished the loser--Marsyas, naturally, for even thinking he could beat a god--by flaying him alive in a cave near the river city of Celaenae.
Plutarch and Arrian are not specific as to whether the Perdiccan generals negotiated in person at Celaenae, but the failure of the negotiations resulted in Alcetas and, presumably, the others retiring to Pisidia or Caria.