Celeron D

Celeron D

A version of Intel's Celeron CPUs introduced in 2004. Celeron D chips are made using the 90 nm strained silicon process and include various internal enhancements. Note that Celeron D chips are not dual core even though they use the D designation as do Pentium D dual core models. See Celeron and Pentium D.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other features include Intel Pentium 4 or Celeron D processors, Gigabit Ethernet LAN, 533 MHz or 667MHz DDR2 SDRAM and a range of SATA hard drive sizes.
The Esys E-PC desktop Celeron D is a perfect entry level machine.
Now it has been relaunched with a set of new processors called Celeron D. The clock speed is no faster than existing Celerons but new design and engineering means it performs better.
New manufacturing techniques have squeezed more and faster transistors into less space and a design revamp has introduced a host of new features that make the Celeron D produce significantly higher performance.
A faster bus means better performance and the Celeron D bus is 33 per cent faster than the old Celeron.
The bottom line is that the Celeron D is still the processor of choice if you're on a budget, but now it has been given a welcome performance boost.
Chip maker Intel Corp has introduced the Intel Celeron D processor for the desktop value market.
Four versions of the Intel Celeron D processor have been released, the 335, 330, 325 and 320, available at frequencies of 2.80 GHz, 2.66 GHz, 2.53 GHz and 2.40 GHz respectively.