cell junction

(redirected from Cell junctions)

cell junction

[′sel ¦jəŋk·shen]
(cell and molecular biology)
A specialized site on a cell at which it is attached to another cell or to the extracellular matrix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many genes related to cell junctions (Tnfa, Tgf[beta], Actin, Tubulin, E-adherin, Tjpl, Tjp2, Tnfr, Integrin, Epsin, Pvrl, Rho Gtpase, Cadherin, Cldn3, Ras and A2m) diversely altered depending on pesticide doses and exposure times, are listed in Table S2 (http://dx.
Malignant cells exhibit numerous anomalies in cell and its membrane which includes high aerobic lactate production, abnormal plasma membrane transport, and reduced number of cell junctions and appearance of new antigens.
65] who clarified that rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, damaged cell junctions and subsequent tubule formation, facilitating inflammatory cell TEM.
Understanding these cell junctions will be important for future biotechnology applications.
Malignant cells show numerous anomalies in cell and its membrane, which include high aerobic lactate production, abnormal plasma membrane transport, reduced number of cell junctions, and appearance of new antigens.
Consistent with this study, cadmium causes slight fragmentation of Setoli cell junctions in the absence of edema or necrosis of testicular tissues in rat at 3 mg/kg (17).
On electron microscopy, ceruminous gland adenoma showed apocrine caps, microvilli, cell junctions, secretory granules, vacuoles, lipid droplets and siderosomes, the characteristic ultrastructural features of apocrine glands.
The connection between these two cellular components--microtubules and cell-cell junctions--occurs via the interaction between the CLASP2 and pi20 catenin proteins, linked to microtubules and cell junctions respectively.
The key factor is the effect that it has on desmosomes, which are specialized cell junctions playing a pivotal role in the attachment of cells to each other.
In addition to increasing the efflux of chloride ions through a protein channel called CFTR, it weakens cell junctions to allow a rapid outflow of counterbalancing sodium ions and water between the cells.
Tumor cells usually contain intermediate filaments, have cell junctions, and may contain glycogen, dense core granules, and neurotubles.