cell-mediated immunity

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cell-mediated immunity

[¦sel ¦mē·dē‚ād·əd i′myü·nəd·ē]
(immunology)
Immune responses produced by the activities of T cells rather than by immunoglobulins.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was also reported that novel immunotherapy related to these CTAs was evaluated in clinical trials among non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma.[23],[24],[25] However, it remains unclear whether the three CTAs and their specific T cell response can be detected in peripheral blood from patients with advanced NPC.
Independent sample t-test was used to compare the mean T cell responses in groups among the test (CII), positive control (PHA) and negative control (RPMI without any stimulant) groups.
2.1 The development and optimization of the human T Cell Priming Assay (hTCPA) for T cell response assessment
"Surprisingly, melanopsin cell responses were lower in SAD year-round, in summer and winter, compared with controls.
"More importantly, we're hopeful that our evaluation of both antibody response and T cell response to Borrelia infection will provide new insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of Lyme disease, which is a potentially serious and increasingly common infection."
"There is a developing understanding that how tightly MHC binds its peptide determines whether you get a T cell response," says team member Lawrence J.
The standard uncertainty in the load cell response R that is associated with the NIST Quantum Electrical Metrology Division determination of these calibration factors is
Elispot measures interferon-gamma, which has been used to indicate a CD8 T cell response. But new results suggest that interferon gamma production does not seem to correlate with reduced viral load or any other benefit to patients.
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles studied the effect of disposition and situational optimism on the number of helper T-cells and the natural killer cell response. In their study, optimism was associated with higher numbers of helper T-cells, and better natural killer cell function.
This dual role of DRs, and the differences observed in the cell response to TRAIL may depend on tumour type and stage and cell context, or they might be related to activation of the specific kinase pathways.
This variation in cell response may determine cancer recurrence and drug resistance, according to the researchers.