celluloid

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celluloid

[from cellulose], transparent, colorless synthetic plasticplastic,
any organic material with the ability to flow into a desired shape when heat and pressure are applied to it and to retain the shape when they are withdrawn. Composition and Types of Plastic
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 made by treating cellulose nitrate with camphor and alcohol. Celluloid was the first important synthetic plastic and was widely used as a substitute for more expensive substances, such as ivory, amber, horn, and tortoiseshell. It is highly flammable and has been largely superseded by newer plastics with more desirable properties. It has been used for combs, brush handles, billiard balls, knife handles, buttons, and other useful objects.

Celluloid

 

a plastic based on cellulose nitrate (pyroxylin). It also contains a plasticizer (dibutyl phthalate, castor oil, petrolatum, or synthetic camphor) and a dye. Celluloid is processed by hot stamping, pressing, and mechanical working. It is used in the manufacture of various products, including plane-table boards, rulers, certain haberdashery goods, and toys. Because Celluloid is highly flammable, there has been a considerable reduction in its use.

celluloid

A relatively tough thermoplastic material made from plasticized cellulose nitrate with camphor; inflammable, easily molded, readily dyed, not light-stable.

celluloid

1. a flammable thermoplastic material consisting of cellulose nitrate mixed with a plasticizer, usually camphor: used in sheets, rods, and tubes for making a wide range of articles
2. 
a. a cellulose derivative used for coating film
b. one of the transparent sheets on which the constituent drawings of an animated film are prepared
c. a transparent sheet used as an overlay in artwork
d. cinema film
References in periodicals archive ?
Divergenze in celluloide offers myriad critical approaches to analyzing films by the Italian-trained director Ozpetek.
In conclusion, Divergenze in celluloide is a rich study of a complex opus by one of the most important auteurs in Italy today.
(1) For a detailed analysis of Celluloide, see my essay, "Celluloide and the Palimpsest of Cinematic Memory: Carlo Lizzani's Film of the Story Behind Open City," in Roberto Rossellini's "Open City," ed.
I refer here to Maurizio Nichetti's Icicle Thief, whose very title announces its parodic relationship to Vittorio De Sica's 1948 classic, and Carlo Lizzani's Celluloide, which tells the story behind the filming of Roberto Rossellini's Rome, Open City (1945).
While Celluloide remains firmly rooted in the soil of the eternal city, Icicle Thief is conspicuously relocated from the Roman streets of De Sica's original, to the high-tech airwaves over Milan.
Lizzani announces his palimpsest approach right from the very start of Celluloide. In its opening frames, actors primp in the make-up rooms of Cinecitta (Rome's vast film studio complex) as they study photographs of the characters whose identities they are to portray.
Again and again, Celluloide tells us that what made Open City such a ground-breaking and risky operation was its courage to refer, to record the very events that Romans had just experienced during the Nazi occupation.
What authenticates this archaeology of the image, and what rescues Lizzani's film from any charges of postmodern simulation, is the strategy of editing into Celluloide brief clips from Open City itself.
There is the argument that Celluloide's referent is itself a text, a signifier meaningful only in relation to its place on the chain of other filmic signs.