Satyricon

(redirected from Cena trimalchionis)

Satyricon

tales of vice and luxury in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]

Satyricon

novel by Petronius depicting social excesses in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Magill II, 938]
References in periodicals archive ?
The 27 papers consider such topics as Babylonian stories and the ancient novel: Magi and the limits of empire in Iamblichus' Babyloniaka, springs as a civilizing mechanism in Daphnis and Chloe, new evidence for dating the discovery at Tra*of the Petronian Cena Trimalchionis, rethinking landscape in ancient fiction: mountains in Apuleius and Jerome, and why Habrocomes does not run away from Aegialeus and his mummified wife: horror and the ancient novel.
Damals publizierte Jean Richard aus Dijon in Paris eine Edition der Satyrica (noch ohne den Grossteil der Cena Trimalchionis), die 34 kurze Einfugungen enthielt.
One of the editors, Ramsby, provides a subtle analysis of the most famous text on Roman freedmen, Petronius's Cena Trimalchionis, in which she draws attention to the stonemason Habana.
The modern reader of the Cena Trimalchionis, seeing the episode grouped under the larger title Satyrica, could hardly be blamed for assuming a priori that Petronius had written a satirical work.
In the Cena Trimalchionis, the protagonist of the Satyrica, a poor but well-educated nebbish of uncertain social status, descends into the house of the fabulously wealthy and fabulously gauche Trimalchio for a theatrical dinner party.
Its longest surviving section, the cena Trimalchionis 'Trimalchio's feast,' lampoons a rich and oafish freedman's ostentatious banquet (roast sow stuffed with sausages being just one of innumerable items on the menu) in a masterful exercise in repeatedly arousing readers' disgust, only to pull us back from the brink of actually vomiting.
This is clearly relevant to my main concern here, the issue of whether the Cena Trimalchionis constitutes a single book: I wish to argue that it does not, and to divide it into three books.
After a brief discussion of Quartilla's Priapean vigil, the discussion turns to the Cena Trimalchionis, the most celebrated episode in Petrionius's narrative.
The longest and the best episode in the surviving portions of the Satyricon is the Cena Trimalchionis, or "Banquet of Trimalchio" (chapters 26-78).
Is this, then, a programmatic allusion that the Cena Trimalchionis should be read with Horace, Satire 2.8 in mind?
Rowell, 'The Gladiator Petraites and the Date of the Satyricon', TAPA 89 (1958), 14-24 and contra Martin Smith, Petroni Arbitri Cena Trimalchionis (Oxford, 1975), ad 52.3.