Cenchrea

Cenchrea

(sĕn`krēə) or

Cenchreae

(–krē-ē'), port of ancient Greece, on the Saronic Gulf, ESE of Corinth. It is mentioned in the New Testament.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Keys for identification of derbid genera that occur in the USA that include Omolicna (or as cenchrea or Syntames) are found in Dozier (1928), Metcalf (1923, 1938), Fennah (1952), Wilson & McPherson (1980), and Bartlett et al.
The tribe Cenchreini with special references to the cenchrea complex (Homoptera: Derbidae).
It was where he met Aquila and Priscilla as well as Phoebe of Cenchrea - the seaport of Corinth.
It is a long letter, and it has been carded nearly 1,000 miles by sea and land from Cenchrea, the port city of Corinth, by a deacon named Phoebe, one of Paul's co-workers (Romans 16:1-2).
Paul commends to the community "our sister Phoebe, a deaconess of the church at Cenchrea ...
89-90 on the issue of the collection for Jerusalem in Acts 11-12, for example, or Paul's vow in Cenchrea, pp.
But in Lamia, begun two years after Endymion, the imaginary landscape of "Greece" has congealed into the topography of Greece: [Lamia] fled into that valley they pass o'er Who go to Corinth from Cenchreas' shore; And rested at the foot of those wild hills, The rugged founts of the Peraean rills, And of that other ridge whose barren back Stretches, with all its mist and cloudy rack, South-westward to Cleone.