Censorinus


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Censorinus

(sĕnsōrī`nəs), fl. c.238, Roman grammarian. He wrote De die natali [on the day of birth], an essay partly astrological, partly chronological, which affords much information on ancient methods of computing time.
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Tumultus interim recuperanda re publica et crudelis interitus oratorum trium, Scaevolae Carbonis Antisti, reditus Cottae Curionis Crassi Lentulorum Pompei; leges et indicia constituta, recuperata res publica; ex numero autem oratorum Pomponius Censorinus Murena sublati.
In Censorinus' De Die Natali, where we find an early version of this definition: "Igitur musica est scientia bene modulandi: haec autem est in voce: sed vox alias gravior mittitur, alias acutior." (40) Here, Censorinus' attention focuses on voice, and bene modulandi only indicates good measuring sound of higher or lower pitch.
Compare Censorinus, 4.7 (G.Axr.38); Plutarch, Symposium, 730e (G.Axr.39).
Censorinus 1503 De die natali liber aureus, Milan, Joannes Angelus Scinzenzeler.
(121) Varron a divise le temps en trois epoques, dont la premiere, qui s'etend de l'apparition de la race humaine au premier deluge, est appelee obscure [phrase omitted] en raison de l'ignorance dont elle est l'objet, selon Censorinus (21, 1; voir J.
Crater Timing Predictions ENTRANCES EXITS Feature UT Feature UT Grimaldi 1:11 Grimaldi 3:31 Aristarchus 1:15 Billy 3:33 Billy 1:18 Campanus 3:37 Kepler 1:18 Tycho 3:38 Pytheas 1:25 Kepler 3:43 Copernicus 1:26 Aristarchus 3:45 Timocharis 1:28 Copernicus 3:51 Plato 1:30 Pytheas 3:53 Campanus 1:31 Timocharis 3:58 Aristoteles 1:38 Plato 4:04 Eudoxus 1:39 Manilius 4:05 Manilius 1:39 Dionysius 4:06 Menelaus 1:42 Menelaus 4:08 Tycho 1:43 Censorinus 4:11 Dionysius 1:45 Plinius 4:11 Plinius 1:46 Eudoxus 4:11 Censorinus 1:53 Aristoteles 4:12 Proclus 1:55 Goclenius 4:12 Taruntius 1:57 Langrenus 4:16 Goclenius 2:00 Taruntius 4:18 Langrenus 2:05 Proclus 4:20
Taking into account, however, that its most pointed self-definition as a libellus non tam diserte quam fideliter scriptus is found--of all places--in the biography of the fictitious emperor Censorinus, (81) the Historia Augusta exposes its own disingenuousness, colluding with the sophisticated reader that it wants to be seen primarily as a literary work with historical contents.
(38.) Intermittently, though, from Measure for Measure, to Richard II's last speech, to Coriolanus' wounds and his possibly absurd ancestor "Censorinus," to Falstaff's muster book (although Shakespeare had no "population" term in anything like our sense), there are analogous moments of hilarity or psychoanalysis about the imagining of abstract groups.
After Rome disarmed the Carthaginians in 149, the consul Censorinus commanded them to more 10 miles from the sea, 'for we are resolved to raze your city to the ground'.
Relocation answers that demand, and the consul Censorinus, in
(5.) In the two most extensive treatises on chronology surviving from antiquity, the natural day is defined as tempus ab oriente sole ad solis occasum "the time from sunrise to sunset" (Censorinus, De die natali XXIII) and [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "the time from sunrise to sunset" (Geminus, Introduction to the Phaenomena VI.1).
Their quality ranges from Proclus's provocative commentary on Timaeus's plan to Censorinus's superstitious speculation on birthdays.