central dogma


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central dogma

[′sen·trəl ′dȯg·mə]
(genetics)
The concept, subject to several exceptions, that genetic information is coded in self-replicating deoxyribonucleic acid and undergoes unidirectional transfer to messenger ribonucleic acids in transcription that act as templates for protein synthesis in translation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The general acceptance of DNA as a largely immutable blueprint, and the central dogma of "genotype causes phenotype", led to the Human Genome Project of the 1990s.
Over the succeeding decades after the development of the Central Dogma, increasingly complex mechanisms have been identified allowing individual cells to regulate their gene expression for cell-specific developmental and environmental response needs.
As is true in other contexts, attachment to the central dogma was also a key to individual advancement: a great incentive to toe the line.
It has been 60 years since the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of the central dogma of molecular biology, wherein DNA serves as a template for RNA and these nucleotides form triplets of letters called codons.
The discovery of the diminishing microRNA markers began with the understanding of a basic process in biology known as the central dogma.
Lynch argues that Latin American Catholicism maintained its core beliefs through the centuries, an interpretation buttressed by defining conversion as acceptance of central dogma without necessarily conforming to church teachings in everyday life.
Crick continued his study and first proposed the principle of genetic central dogma, which paved the way for the study of genetics.
Duarte and Lima (economics, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil) gather historians of macroeconomics to examine the roots of the central dogma of current macroeconomics and to investigate issues surrounding the relationship between macro and microeconomics.
In molecular biology, proteins are known to be constructed by a process, called the central dogma, of converting a gene to protein via the transcription and translation phases, where transcription refers to the phase of producing ribonucleic acid, or RNA, copies from deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA.
In the Indian context, secularism is not only characterized by equality among religions in the eyes of the state, but also by a tendency among political formations to distinguish themselves from some parties that hold Hindutva (literally Hindu-ness) politics, marked by a "Hindu view of India", as a central dogma.
Thus it covers central dogma of molecular biology along with other features.
Genetic loophole The occasional switch of a chemical unit in RNA to a slightly different form can cause a cell's protein-building machinery to roll right through a molecular stop sign, a find that violates the central dogma of genetics (SN: 7/16/11, p.

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