cyanosis

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Related to Central cyanosis: Peripheral cyanosis

cyanosis

(sī'ənō`sĭs), bluish coloration of the skin, mucous membranes, and nailbeds, resulting from a lack of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood. It is a symptom of many disorders, including various pulmonary and heart diseases and many congenital heart defects (see blue babyblue baby,
infant born with a congenital heart defect that causes a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of cyanosis (deoxygenated blood). The color is most noticeable around the lips and at the tips of the fingers and toes.
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). Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose, ears). In such cases the capillary blood gives up more than normal amounts of oxygen. Although this type of cyanosis can be caused by reduced cardiac output (e.g., in congestive heart failure), the most common causes are nervous tension and exposure to cold. Another type of cyanosis results from poisoning, either by nitrates in contaminated food or water or by certain chemicals and drugs.

Cyanosis

 

in medicine, a bluish violet discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes that occurs with human diseases accompanied by circulatory and respiratory disorders.


Cyanosis

 

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes. The condition ranges in coloration from gray-blue to black-blue (“cast iron”). Cyanosis is due to an increase in the concentration (more than 5 g percent) of reduced hemoglobin, which has a bluish coloration, in capillary blood. Intense cyanosis of the extremities is called acrocyanosis. A distinction is made between central cyanosis, which results from a disturbance of oxygen saturation of blood in the lungs, and peripheral cyanosis, which results from a slowing of the blood flow and from extensive oxygen extraction into the surrounding tissues. Central cyanosis is observed mainly in pulmonary diseases, congenital heart diseases, and poisonings by carbon dioxide and aniline derivatives. Peripheral cyanosis is seen in heart diseases caused by circulatory disturbances and conditions such as thrombophlebitis and Raynaud’s disease in which a local slowing of blood flow occurs. False cyanosis is caused by a change in the color of the skin itself.

cyanosis

[‚sī·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
A bluish coloration in the skin and mucous membranes due to deficient levels of oxygen in the blood.

cyanosis

Pathol a bluish-purple discoloration of skin and mucous membranes usually resulting from a deficiency of oxygen in the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Central cyanosis (cyanosis affecting the inner portion of the lips, the tongue, and the nail beds) is often seen with pathologic heart murmurs.
Symptoms Fever 53 (96) Vomiting 35 (64) Poor feeding 27 (49) Dyspnes 23 (42) Increased sleepiness 17 (31) Cough 14 (26) Irritability 11 (20) Generalized weekness 14 (26) Diarrhes 7 (13) Rhinorrhes 6 (11) Signs Skin/Mueous membrane Hand or foot rash 32 (58) Mouth unclers 28 (51) Herpangina 8 (15) Respiratory Rales 26 (48) Rhonchi 21 (39) Retractions 17 (32) Cardiac Central cyanosis 28 (52) Peripheral cyanosis 22 (41) Neurologic Somnolent or lethargic 24 (44) Comatose 13 (24) Alert 9 (17) Nuchal rigidity 7 (13) Seizure 7 (13) Focal paralysis or weakness 1 ( 2) (*.
However, our retrospective data showed that a high amount of SulfHb was clearly present, in concentrations sufficient to cause the central cyanosis observed on admission.
High-risk patients requiring PO can include children with breathing obstruction, central cyanosis, respiratory distress, shock, coma, convulsions, and severe dehydration as emergency signs.
None of the babies in our study, even when they had SpO2 values well below 90%, were observed to have central cyanosis by the team of investigators, a finding also supported by other studies.
It was thought that the patient might have pulmonary arteriovenous malformation or fistula because of presence of central cyanosis, recurrent epistaxis and telengiectasies on the face, absence of pathology in the heart and exclusion of methemoglobinemia.
Fine inspiratory crackles was the most common physical sign present in 49 patients (98%), wheeze in 30 patients (60%), finger clubbing in 19 patients (38%), ankle odema in 11 patients (22%) central cyanosis in 10 patients (20%), raised jugular venous pressure in 8 patients (16%) and skin lesions in 4 patients (8%) (Figure 1).
On physical examination, the patient has central cyanosis, pretibial edema and her lung sounds were decreased to auscultation bilaterally with deep inspiration.
Central cyanosis and plethora develop with the onset of hypoxia.
He had clubbing, central cyanosis, heart rate of 102 per minute, respiratory rate of 18 per minute and blood pressure of 96/54 mm of Hg.
Her examination showed pulse:97/min; BP: 135/81mmHg; RR:20/min; SpO2:89-92% with FiO2 at 2L/min; ECG showed normal sinus rhythm with tachycardia, T-wave inversions in lead III and V1, strain pattern in anterior chest leads, right ventricular hypertrophy; Clubbing in both hands, mild peripheral and central cyanosis with pale complexion.

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