central pressure


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central pressure

[′sen·trəl ′presh·ər]
(meteorology)
At any given instant, the atmospheric pressure at the center of a high or low; the highest pressure in a high, the lowest pressure in a low.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to brachial pressure -- which is the pressure moving away from your heart and measured with an arm cuff in the doctor's office -- central pressure is the pressure moving toward your heart.
Tropical storm Lee reached its lowest central pressure of 986 mb and its peak vertical velocity of 63.95 m [s.sup.-1] on September 4th, coinciding with its peak CAPE.
Larson et al., "Forward and backward wave morphology and central pressure augmentation in men and women in the framingham heart study," Hypertension, vol.
interval training was found not to affect the parameters of central pressure nor peripheral measurements of blood pressure and echocardiographical parameters of left ventricular filling.
"At present the estimated central pressure of Cyclonic Storm is 996 hpa and the average sustained wind speed around is 4550 Knots gusting up to 55 Knots" the advisory informed.
At present the estimated central pressure of cyclone is 994 hpa and the average sustained wind speed around is 7080 Knots gusting up to 90 Knots.
At present the estimated central pressure of Cyclone is 990 hpa and the average sustained wind speed around is 90100 gusting up to 110 Knots.
Vongfong has a central pressure of 965 hPa and a wind speed of 126 kilometers (78 miles) per hour, with gusts as strong as 180 kilometers (112 miles) per hour.
The typhoon Halong, which received the 11th category in Japan, is currently heading towards the southern prefecture of Okinawa with central pressure at 950 millibars and the speed of 90 miles per hour (40 meters per second).
As seems in this pattern a high pressure center with the central pressure of 1022 HECTOPASCAL over 63 degrees east altitude and 41 degrees of north latitude has been formed.
"This feeds back to decrease wave height, which reduces movement of air toward the centre of the hurricane, increasing the central pressure -- which in turn slows the winds of the entire hurricane and dissipates it faster." Wind speed, storm surge are braked In the case of Hurricane Katrina, sustained peak wind speed would have been reduced by as much as 44 metres per second (158 kilometres or 98 miles per hour).
Using the liquid model, the pressure inside stars can be calculated as a function of radius, including the central pressure. As pointed out by the authors, the temperature of the incompressible liquid star does not depend on pressure, only on the source of stellar energy.

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