Cephisodotus


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Cephisodotus

(sĕfĭsŏ`dətəs), Gr. Kephisodotos, fl. 4th cent. B.C., two Greek sculptors. The elder, the master and probably the father or the brother of Praxiteles, is noted for the statue Irene and Plutus [Peace and Wealth]. The original was erected on the Areopagus at Athens c.372 B.C. to celebrate the victory of Timotheus over the Spartans. The best copy is in Munich. Cephisodotus, the Younger, a son of Praxiteles, continued the Praxitelean tradition into the early 3d cent. B.C.
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24 and 32) an Apollo statue stood in the temple and was flanked by a Leto and an Artemis by Cephisodotus and Timotheus respectively.
This representation can be seen on a set of Panathenaic amphorae (LIMC 'Eirene' 6, 7) from the archonship of Callimedes (360-359 AC), (30) aside from the most famous statue group erected in Antiquity in honour of the goddess, the Eirene of Cephisodotus (c.
31) We refer to Cephisodotus the Elder, who will have attained artistic maturity around 400-360 BC, and was possibly the father of Praxiteles.