Cepphus


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Cepphus

 

a genus of birds of the family Alcidae. The body is 32–40 cm long and weighs 340–600 g. The bill is black, straight, and thin. The plumage of the adults is black in summer and mottled in winter. The feet are red. The birds fly, swim, and dive well, but they walk poorly. The diet consists of small fishes and marine invertebrates. The birds nest in groups in the crevices of cliffs or amid rocks. The clutch usually contains two eggs. The young are born with dense, soft, dark down; they leave the nest fully fledged.

There are two (or three) species. The black guillemot, or sea pigeon (C. grylle), lives along the coasts of the Arctic, North Atlantic, and Pacific oceans; those occurring in the Pacific are sometimes regarded as the separate species C. columba. The sooty guillemot (C. carbo), which has a white circle around the eyes, is common along the coasts of the seas of Okhotsk and Japan. In some places the birds are used commercially for their meat and eggs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sequence variation in the guillemot (Alcidae: Cepphus) mitochondrial control region and its nuclear homolog.
The adaptive significance of the reproductive pattern in the black guillemot Cepphus grylle.
Black Guillemot Several thousand pairs breed in crevices on (Cepphus cliffs along the south and west coasts and grylle) adjacent to the North Spit (Gaston et al., 2012).
Black Guillemot: Black guillemots (Cepphus grille) bred at all three sites.
Lawrence Island contained remains of a black guillemot (Cepphus grylle; Fay et al., 1990), and one account states that a walrus stomach was "full" of murres (age of birds not given, Nelson, 1969:354).
Observations at these colonies focused on six species, namely thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia), black guillemots (Cepphus grylle), northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus), and common eiders (Somateria mollissima borealis), but we had occasional observations on other species during breeding (Tables 2, 3).
290, he mentions "lummes"; this term, sometimes also rendered as "looms," was the name whalers used variously for the black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) or the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia).
If the location was correctly reported, however, the site comprises one larger island and three islets, apparently without breeding arctic terns, but with breeding common eider (Somateria mollissima), black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus).
Britten Harter, University of Manitoba, is studying the effects of global warming and the retreat of Arctic pack ice on the daily chick growth and breeding success of the black guillemot (Cepphus grylle); and Lea Randall, University of Calgary, is researching the response of insectivorous mammals to insect infestation in the northern boreal forest.
We observed small numbers of other seabirds in deep waters, including Sabine's gulls (Xema sabini), black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea), black guillemots (Cepphus grylle), and unidentified auklets (Aethia spp.).
Birds described as dovekies (Alle alle) by Greely must have been black guillemots (Cepphus grylle), since the reported amount of meat from an individual exceeded 1 pound (0.4 kg).
In contrast, the southeastern Beaufort Sea has only two small seabird colonies: a colony of about 800 thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) on the cliffs of Cape Parry (Johnson and Ward, 1985) and a colony of approximately 100 black guillemots (Cepphus grylle) nesting within rock piles and old buildings at Herschel Island (Ward and Mossop, 1986).