Cerambycidae


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Related to Cerambycidae: Longhorn beetle

Cerambycidae

[se·rəm′bī·sə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The longhorn beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Chrysomeloidea.

Cerambycidae

 

a family of insects of the order Coleoptera. The body is oblong and measures 3-180 mm long. The antennae are often quite long, and the jaws are well developed. The body coverings are hard and diversely colored (often speckled). The larvae are fleshy, with a very large prothorax and special bulges—“motor callosities”—on the abdominal segments. The legs of most are not developed. The larvae live in wood (on which they also feed), occasionally in the stems of herbaceous plants, and less often in the soil (where they feed on roots). The development of the larvae usually lasts about a year, sometimes longer.

There are about 20,000 species distributed throughout the world, the most numerous being in the tropics. About 800 species are found in the USSR, of which the largest is the Callipogon relictus, which may measure up to 10 cm long. Many cerambycids are wood and lumber pests. In coniferous forests representatives of the genus Monochamus inflict severe damage. Oak trees are damaged by the Cerambyx cerdo. The Hylotrupes bajulus destroys wooden structures and telegraph poles in the forested steppe and steppe regions. Pests of structures and wooden articles are destroyed by treating the infested wood; preventive measures include impregnating the wood with beetle repellants or long-acting insecticides. In forests, control reduces mainly to destroying the infested trees and to the timely removal from the forest of dead trees, windfalls, freshly sawed lumber, and deadwood.

N. N. PLAVIL’sHCHIKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Zur Faunistik und Taxonomie der Bockkaferfauna der Turkei II (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).
armatum was confirmed, including trypsin-, chymotrypsin-and elastase-like activities, consistent with some reports that associate serine proteases with certain coleopteran families, including the Cerambycidae family.
Three potential coleopteran pests were found in the feces of big brown bats flying in apple orchards and each belonged to a different family--the Cerambycidae, Chyrsomelidae, and Scarabaeidae (Table 1).
Mortality of the endangered Wright fishhook cactus (Sclerocactus wrightiae) by an opuntia-borer beetle (Cerambycidae: Moneilema semipunctatum).
Other specialists were: Robert Androw (Cerambycidae, Buprestidae & Cleridae); Richard Beal (Dermestidae, esp.
Kairomonal responses of Coleoptera, Monochamus titallator (Cerambycidae), Thanasimus dubius (Cleridae), and Temnochila virescens (Trogossitidae), to behavioral chemicals of southern pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).
Transmission curves of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Nematoda: Aphelenchoididae) from its vector, Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), to pine trees with reference to population performance.
The members of each beetle guild are usually not closely related species but representatives of different tribes of Cerambycidae. The plant species that constitute the hosts for these guilds usually have similar phytochemical profiles.
Molecular phylogenetic relationships of flightless beetles belonging to the genus Mesechthistatus Breuning (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) inferred from mitochondrial COI gene sequences.