Ceratoides

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ceratoides

 

a genus of low monoecious shrubs and subshrubs of the family Chenopodiaceae. The elliptic or lanceolate leaves are covered with stellate hairs, as are the annual shoots. The small, unisexual flowers have a four-parted simple perianth. There are seven or eight species, distributed in Southern Europe, Asia, North America, and—very rarely—North Africa. The plants grow in rocky and gravelly places in steppes, semideserts, and deserts. The USSR has two species: C. latens (formerly Eurotia ceratoides) and C. eversmanniana (formerly E. evers-manniana). C. latens grows in the southern half of the European USSR, in Middle Asia, in Siberia, and in the Caucasus. Both species are used as fuel and fodder, especially for camels.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common tree in the reserve is Haloxylon ammodendron, and the typical shrubs are Anabasis salsa, Atraphaxis frutescens, Calligonum mongolicum, Ceratocarpus arenarius, Ceratoides latens, and Reaumuria soongorica.
Dominant plants on mesas were four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), rubber rabbitbrush (Crysothamnus nauseosus), mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus intricatus), winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), galleta grass (Hilaria jamesii), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), bigelow sage (Artemisia bigelovii), pinyon pine (Pinus edulis), one-seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma), and Utah juniper (J.
The pollen production of local taxa is very low, among which Betula nana, Salix, Selaginella selaginoides, Dryas octopetala and steppe xerophytes Eurotia ceratoides, Ephedra and halophilous taxa Kochia prostrata, Salsola kali and Salicornia herbaceae have been identified (Pirrus 1971).
Response of winterfat (Ceratoides lanata) communities to release from grazing pressure.
Slightly saline soils support abundant clumps of the chenopod Krascheninnikovia [= Eurotia = Ceratoides] ceratoides. The moist saline depressions and the dry beds of rivers are often covered by the greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Chenopodi-aceae), another shrubby chenopod that only grows 5 ft (1.5 m) tall but has a root system 7 ft (2 m) deep.
Shrub/succulent standing crop was dominated by Opuntia polyacantha (Table 1) with only a scattering of Ceratoides lanata and Coryphantha missouriensis.
These salt desert communities are dominated by shrubs, including Ceratoides lanata, Artemisia spinescens, Atriplex confertifolia, and Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus.
Historically, the Snake River Plain of southwestern Idaho was dominated largely by native shrubs (Atriplex, Artemisia, Ceratoides, Chrysothamnus, and Purshia) interspersed with native perennial bunchgrasses (Stipa, Poa, Oryzopsis, Festuca, Sitanion, and Elymus; Yensen 1982).
The loamy site was characterized by winterfat (Ceratoides lanata), Torrey yucca (Yucca torreyi), longleaf yucca, mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), burrograss (Scleropogon brevifolius) and blue grama.
The most common desert tree in the reserve is Haloxylon ammodendron, and the usual shrubs are Anabasis salsa, Artemisia, Atraphaxis frutescens, Calligonum mongolicum, Ceratocarpus arenarius, Ceratoides lateens, and Reaumuria soongorica.