Ceratophyllaceae


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Related to Ceratophyllaceae: Ceratophyllum

Ceratophyllaceae

[‚ser·ə·tō·fə′lās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of rootless, free-floating dicotyledons in the order Nymphaeales characterized by unisexual flowers and whorled, cleft leaves with slender segments.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ceratophyllaceae

 

a family of monoecious dicotyledonous plants containing the single genus Ceratophyllum. The plants are rootless perennial aquatic grasses with whorls of forked, dissected, sessile leaves. The tiny flowers are unisexual, solitary, and axillary. The calycine perianth consists of eight to 12 sections joined at the base. The fruit is a nut with a persistent thorny stem. Pollination occurs underwater.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic diversity in the monoecious hydrophilous Ceratophyllum (Ceratophyllaceae).
It is mostly monosymmetry by simplicity, by the presence of only one carpel and/or only one stamen, such as in Hydatellaceae (Hamann, 1975; Saarela et al., 2007; Rudall et al., 2007), Trimeniaceae (Endress, 2001b), Chloranthaceae (Endress, 1987; Kong et al., 2002), Ceratophyllaceae (Endress, 2001b, 2004), some Winteraceae (Igersheim & Endress, 1997), Piperaceae (Tucker, 1984; Tucker et al., 1993), Degeneriaceae, Myristieaceae (Igersheim & Endress, 1997), Lauraceae (Endress, 1972), and Hernandiaceae (Endress & Lorence, 2004).
SC/NM 4 N V R SpSu CERATOPHYLLACEAE Ceratophyllum demersum L.
All of the basal angiosperms have vessels except for Amborellaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Nymphaeales, and Winteraceae.
71) and positioned between Nymphaeaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. See Friis & Crane (Nature 446: 269-270.
30 Dec 1999.--Type: Ceratophyllum L.; Ceratophyllaceae Gray, 1821.
(2000), with respect to the basal relationships of the Angiosperms (Ceratophyllaceae vs.