Cercocebus


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cercocebus

 

(mangabeys), a genus of lower catarrhine monkeys of the subfamily Cercopithecinae.

The body length of the mangabey is 50-60 cm; the tail length, 75-95 cm. The extremities are long. There are large cheek pouches. The color of the hair ranges from gray to black. Some species have a tuft on the head. The mangabeys are distributed in Central and West Africa. They inhabit forests and are mainly arboreal, living in bands of as many as 20-40. They are very mobile and agile. Mangabeys are often kept in zoos, where they reproduce readily.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The golden-bellied mangabey (Cercocebus chrysogaster) is absent in the northern SNP and north of the southern sector, occurring only in regions south of the Lokolo River (Inogwabini and Thompson in preparation).
Mangebey (Cercocebus albigena) movement patterns in relation to food availability and fecal contamination.
Courgnaud V, Van Dooren S, Liegeois F, Pourrut X, Abela B, Loul S, Mpoudi-Ngole E, Vandamme A, Delaporte E, Peeters M (2004) Simian T-cell leukemia virus (STLV) infection in wild primate populations in Cameroon: evidence for dual STLV type 1 and type 3 infection in agile mangabeys (Cercocebus agilis).
A white crowned mangabey (Cercocebus torquatus lunulatus) was also found to be infected with a virus closely related to [SIV.sub.AGM] from vervet monkeys (9), but this transmission most likely occurred in captivity (2).
Results of quantitative PCR from tissues of a wild-living sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys), TaT National Park, Cote d'lvoire, March 2012 * Tissue [C.sub.t] [C.sub.t] [DELTA][C.sub.t], OPV rpo18 c-myc rpo18-c-myc Spleen 32.0 22.1 -9.9 Lung 34.3 27.8 -6.5 Kidney 28.2 18.9 -9.3 ([dagger]) Skin 16.9 26.9 9.9 Liver 30.3 20.0 -10.3 ([dagger]) Heart 32.2 25.0 -7.2 Intestine 32.2 31.1 0.1 Muscle ND ND ND Thymus 15.8 19.7 3.9 ([dagger]) Throat swab 21.5 28.4 6.9 ([dagger]) Lymph node 24.1 20.2 -3.9 ([dagger]) * Virus DNA (rpo18) was quantified in relation to cellular c-myc DNA in 1 U.L DNA; higher values indicate higher virus loads in a respective tissue.
Another 3 HTLV-1 sequences were closely related to STLV-1 sequences found in sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) from Tai National Park (bootstrap, 83; posterior probabilities, 1) (Figure 2; online Technical Appendix Table 2), whereas the last 1 was related to STLV-1 sequences from red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius badius) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) from Tai National Park (bootstrap, 98; posterior probabilities, 1) (Figure 2; online Technical Appendix, Table 2) (7,8).
SIVsmm in sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus attys) from west Africa are the closest relatives of HIV-2 (4,5).
solatus, Cercocebus torquatus, Gorilla gorilla, Lophocebus albigena, Mandrillus sphinx, Miopithecus ogoouensis, and Pan troglodytes species.
Similarly, PTLV-3s exhibit broad diversity among NHPs in the wild; currently, 3 subtypes have been suggested according to the geographic origin of the strains (17): East African STLV-3 subtype A includes STLV-3 (PH969) found in a baboon (Papio hamadryas) from Eritrea (18) and from captive gelada baboons (Theropithecus gelada) (19); West and Central African STLV-3 subtype B includes STLV-3 (CTO-604) and STLV-3 (CTO-602) found among mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) from Cameroon (20) and STLV-3 (PPAF3) from baboons (P.
Molecular epidemiology of simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) in wild-caught monkeys and apes from Cameroon: a new STLV-1, related to human T-lymphotropic virus subtype F, in a Cercocebus agilis.
HIV-1 groups M, N, and O are believed to have arisen as 3 separate cross-species transmissions from chimpanzees, and each of the HIV-2 subtypes A-G was the result of independent transmissions from sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) to humans.
The closest simian relatives of HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been found in the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys), respectively (6-8), and phylogenetic evidence indicates that lentiviruses from these species (SIVcpz and SIVsm, respectively) have been transmitted to humans on at least eight occasions (5,9).