concussion

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Related to Cerebral Concussion: Cerebral contusion

concussion

a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

concussion

[kən′kəsh·ən]
(engineering)
Shock waves in the air caused by an explosion underground or at the surface or by a heavy blow directly to the ground surface during excavation, quarrying, or blasting operations.
(medicine)
A state of shock following traumatic injury, especially cerebral trauma, in which there is temporary functional impairment without physical evidence of damage to impaired tissues.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cerebral concussions frequently affect athletes in both contact and non-contact sports.
The most relevant acute consequence is the knock-out, which is related to cerebral concussion.
Guidelines for return to contact sports after cerebral concussion. Phys Sportsmed 1986;14:75-83.
Hallmark PCS/PCD features include a history of head trauma that has caused a significant cerebral concussion, manifestations of concussion that include loss of consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia, and less commonly, posttraumatic onset of seizures, evidence of difficulty in attention (concentrating, shifting focus of attention, performing simultaneous cognitive tasks) or memory, and symptoms developing shortly after the trauma and lasting at least 3 months such as becoming fatigued easily, disordered sleep, headache, vertigo or dizziness, irritability or aggression on little or no provocation, anxiety, depression, or affective liability, changes in personality (e.g., social or sexual inappropriateness) and apathy or lack of spontaneity.
Recognizing and managing the effects of cerebral concussion are vitally important to those involved in the healthcare of athletes.

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