hypoxic encephalopathy

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Related to Cerebral hypoxia: cerebral hemorrhage

hypoxic encephalopathy

[hī′päk·sik en‚sef·ə′läp·ə‚thē]
(medicine)
Brain damage syndrome caused by hypoxia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cerebral hypoxia is known to be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, and it implicates many pathological disorders in brain including neuron energy depletion, excitotoxicity injury and a great number of free radicals production (1, 2).
Actions of Ginkgo Biloba related to potential utility for the treatment of conditions involving cerebral hypoxia.
Cerebral hypoxia will progress until it becomes irreversible and death occurs.
Diagnostic indications for ICP monitoring include TBI, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke accompanied by significant cerebral edema, brain tumor, neuroinfectious processes, decompensated hydrocephalus, cerebral hypoxia or anoxia producing edema, or Reyes syndrome (Bader & Littlejohns; Dunn, 2002).
head injury, cerebral hypoxia, and stroke (2), and of malignant melanoma (3).
Increased levels of 4-HNE have been identified in many pathologic processes, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cerebral hypoxia.
The study showed that cerebral hypoxia (low brain oxygen) in head-injured patients is common, is associated with poor outcomes and death and can be easily monitored with cerebral oximetry.
A postmortem revealed he died of cerebral hypoxia due to obstruction of the airwaves.
Once an initial injury to the brain has occurred, the cascade of events that follows includes altered cerebral perfusion, increased intracranial pressure, and cerebral hypoxia, which all increase the risk of ischemia.
She added that Phipps suffered cerebral hypoxia and that a urine test found cocaine and benzodiazopine in his system.
Continuous brain tissue oxygen monitoring is a method to measure oxygen delivery and identify cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in patients with brain injury, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, malignant stroke, or other patients at risk for secondary brain injury.
2] values; therefore aggressive treatment is not necessary as signs of cerebral hypoxia are not apparent.