Cervantes


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Related to Cervantes: Don Quixote

Cervantes

Miguel de , full surname Cervantes Saavedra. 1547--1616, Spanish dramatist, poet, and prose writer, most famous for Don Quixote (1605), which satirizes the chivalric romances and greatly influenced the development of the novel
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It is important to mention the fact that on this occasion, Cervantes does not allow the reader to extract his own teachings, but he himself renders them at the end: "This tale may teach us what virtue and what beauty can effect, since they are sufficient together, or either singly, to win the love even of enemies; and how Heaven is able to bring forth our greatest happiness even out of our heaviest misfortunes.
Everything coincides to lead us to believe that Cervantes is there," forensics export Francisco Etxeberria told a news conference.
En la primera decada del siglo XVI, Cervantes tenia, pues, un numeroso grupo de fans o de admiradores, lectores y lectoras con quienes habia establecido vinculos de sincera cordialidad desde la publicacion de la primera parte de Don Quijote.
Panamericana and Cervantes are the eleventh and fifteenth largest players, respectively, in the Ecuadorian property and casualty insurance market.
Cascardi argues that the novelist and playwright Miguel de Cervantes was a political thinker and that his great literary experiment, Don Quijote, is deeply concerned with political discourse.
She then saw Cervantes approach and take hold of her handbag which she was carrying in her right hand.
They believe the procedure will lead to the growth of bone cells that will fuse her cervical spine which had rejected earlier a titanium implant, Cervantes said.
As we talk, Cervantes sat across a table in Humphrey's backyard.
It is true that Cervantes was forced to cope with the picaresque in some way, especially since Don Quixote (1605) was published on the heels of Mateo Aleman's wildly popular picaresque narrative Guzman de Alfarache (1599), which went through more than twelve editions before its second part appeared in 1604.
After placing Cervantes within a historical and literary tradition, she turns to Flaubert and the acknowledged influence Cervantes had on him.
In order to facilitate this understanding, Passalacqua and Cervantes presented a short literature review touching upon each of these three areas.
This is the question that Rogelio Minana attempts to answer in his book Monstruos que hablan: el discurso de la monstruosidad en Cervantes.