Cetonian Beetles

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cetonian Beetles

 

(Cetoniinae), a subfamily of beetles of the scarab (Scarabeidae) family. Characteristic of the Cetonian beetles are a notch on the sides of the elytrons (allowing the beetle to fly with folded elytrons) and bright metallic coloring. The larvae of the Cetonian beetles are S-shaped, lack ungues on the feet, and are able to move on their backs. They develop in decomposing vegetable remains (rotten wood, compost, forest debris). There are more than 2, 600 species, the majority of which are distributed in the tropics. There are 58 species in the USSR; the common ones are the goldsmith beetle (Cetonia aurata), whose larvae are found in rotten deciduous stumps and hollows; Potosia mettalica, whose larvae are found in anthills; P. hungarica, whose larvae are found in the dens of rodents; and Epicometis hirpa, whose larvae are found in the soil. Certain species of Cetonian beetles are harmful to crops, eating the leaves, blossoms, and fruits. Larvae of Cetonian beetles occasionally eat the roots of plants in flower beds.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.