basking shark

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basking shark,

large, plankton-feeding shark, Cetorhinus maximus, inhabiting many oceans of the world, especially in temperate regions. Found singly or in schools of up to 100, it spends much of its time on or just below the surface, cruising slowly with its dorsal fin breaking water. It reaches a length of 40 ft (12 m) and weighs up to 8,500 lb (3,900 kg)—among fishes it is second in size only to the whale shark. It feeds by filtering out plankton as water passes into its mouth and out of the gills. Its gill openings are greatly enlarged to accommodate a large volume of water, and its throat is lined with numerous slender structures called gill rakers. These rakers, which are attached to the inside of the gill arches, form a fine mesh that serves as a strainer. The basking shark has a torpedo-shaped body, a nearly symmetrical tail fin, and long, conspicuous gill slits. Its color ranges from gray to black or brown. It is fished commercially, mostly by harpooning; its flesh is used for fish meal and its liver oil for certain tanning processes. It is classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Chondrichthyes, order Selachii, family Cetorhinidae.

basking shark

a very large plankton-eating shark, Cetorhinus maximus, often floating at the sea surface: family Cetorhinidae
References in periodicals archive ?
The Family Cetorhinidae Gill, 1862, includes one extant genus, Cetorhinus Blainville, 1816, and a single living species, the basking shark, C.
Alopias superciliosus * Alopias vulpinus Carcharodon carcharias * Cetorhinus maximus * Isurus oxyrinchus * Lamna nasus ?
vulpinus 48 2 Basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus 156 0 White shark, Carcharodon carcharias 36 2 Shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus 3,457 320 Longfin mako, I.
In addition, Parker and Stott (1965) suggested that 2 band pairs were laid down annually in the Basking Shark (Cetorhinus maximus); however, those conclusions were questioned by Pauly (4) (2002).
This material has produced, in addition to LACM 40211, more than 100,000 teleostean otoliths (saccular), which represent as many as 65 species belonging to 30 or more families, several thousand teeth of sharks, skates, and rays, Cetorhinus (basking shark) gill takers, and hundreds of squid statoliths (Clarke and Fitch 1979).
Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus; and basking sharks, Cetorhinus maximus, are filter feeders and, except for accidental entanglement, would not be a component of longline catches.
Chondrichthyes Lamnidae Isurus oxyrinchus Rafinesque, 1810 Cetorhinidae Cetorhinus sp.
Basking sharks, Cetorhinus maximus, are frequently observed along the central and northwestern southern California coast during the winter and spring months.
Unlike basking (Cetorhinus maximus) and megamouth (Megachasma pelagios) sharks, which passively filter prey from the water column, whale sharks are capable of suction filter feeding (Colman, 1997).
The rest of the shark species identified were the porbeagle (Lamna nasus), bigeyed thresher shark (Alopias superciliosus), smooth hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena), bluntnose sixgill shark (Hexanchus griseus), sandbar shark (Carcharinus plumbeus), longnose spurdog (Squalus blainvillei), smoothhound (Mustelus mustelus), and basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus).