Guizhou

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Guizhou

or

Kweichow

(both: gwā`jō`), province (2010 pop. 34,746,468), c.66,000 sq mi (170,940 sq km), SW China. GuiyangGuiyang
or Kweiyang
, city (1994 est. pop. 1,131,200), capital of Guizhou prov., SW China. On the main road from Kunming to Chongqing, it is also a rail (since 1959) and industrial center.
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 is the capital and chief city; ZunyiZunyi
or Tsunyi
, town (1994 est. pop. 295,200), N Guizhou prov., SW China. It is on the main highway to Sichuan and is the commercial and agricultural distribution center of N Guizhou.
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 and Duyun are important towns. Guizhou is almost entirely a high plateau, and its sheer limestone hills form some of the most spectacular karst scenery in the world. Guizhou has many deep river valleys, notably those of the Wu (the major river), the He, and the Yuan. The climate is mild and the rainfall adequate, but the soil is poor and there is little arable land. Rice is the major crop; the same amount of acreage is given to corn but with about half the yield. Soybeans, wheat, oats, barley, sweet potatoes, sorghum, and beans are raised for food. Commerical crops include rapeseed, tobacco, tea, peanuts, oakleaf silk, sugarcane, and indigo. Cotton is being developed. Guizhou has rich forests, and lumber, tung oil, lacquer, and paint are produced. Mineral resources, which are important to the province, include mercury, coal, iron, zinc, lead, copper, manganese, and gold. With unnavigable rivers, a limited railway system, and well-developed highways, transportation in the province is adequate. The province has two autonomous districts: one in the southeast, peopled by Miao (known for their embroideries) and Dong; and another in the south, inhabited by Puyi and Miao. Chinese settlement of the region began around 2,000 years ago, but it was only in the 10th cent. that it passed under the suzerainty of China. Guizhou became a province in the 17th cent. under the Ming dynasty, but the native Miaos were not completely subdued until about 1870. The traditional name of Guizhou is Kien or Qian. Guizhou Univ. is in Guiyang.

Guizhou

, Kweichow, Kueichou
a province of SW China, between the Yangtze and Xi Rivers: a high plateau. Capital: Guiyang. Pop.: 38 700 000 (2003 est.). Area: 174 000 sq. km (69 278 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Evelyn Nien-Ming Ch'ien chama atencao para o fato de que tais manifestacoes tem sido estudadas com muito mais frequencia como fenomenos culturais do que do ponto de vista estetico.
(19) The rule of Ch'ien Lung for sixty years was also one of nobility, yet his favourite minister, Ho Shen, grand secretary, was a source of corruption for the succeeding regime.
At Madame Tou's party, attempts for a joyous recreation of the good old days through classical opera leads to the stirring of Madame Ch'ien's haunting past.
The recent exhibition "The Island of Oddities - The Secret Collection of Yuan Meng Ch'ien" brings together some new work and ideas and also displays some works in progress as well as older pieces in the vein that Island 6 has become known for.
Perhaps Wu Li deserves the final word on this matter, through the medium of one of his "aria" poems, "To the Tune, Hsi ch'ien ying" ("Delighted With the Oriole Messenger," a title identifying the pattern of line-lengths but having nothing to do with the content).
In it were poems by Li Po ("the high heavenly priest of the White Lake," Charles calls him in "Portrait of the Artist with Li Po"), Tu Fu, T'ao Ch'ien, and Wang Wei--master eremites all.
While the personalities and impact-strategies differ radically among Chen Yeng the traditionalist, Chao Hwei the activist, Kuan Ch'ien the academic aesthete, and Ching Hai the New Age guru, they all have garnered international acclaim and support for their relief efforts, charitable works, public welfare institutions, structural justice initiatives, ecological activism, feminist leadership, food consciousness, and yes, even spiritual fashion-forwardness.
None of these writers are immigrants, and yet their language resembles what Evelyn Nien-Ming Ch'ien, in her study of late-twentieth-century immigrant writers, calls "weird English." Ch'ien associates "weird forms of English" with "the authors' bi- or polycultural status and context influencing this English" (4), which would seem to imply that white writers do not write "weird English," and yet as I have indicated, white regionals in the late-nineteenth-century United States became "Other, marked" in ways that called their "whiteness" into question.
In these tables, there is a row of eight trigrams across the top (Ch'ien [heaven], Chen [thunder], K'an [abysmal], Ken [mountain], K'un [earth], Sun [wind], Li [fire], Tui [lake]; the same order of trigrams is followed in the vertical column on the left side.
The influence of this remarkable story on T'ao Ch'ien [Tao Qian]'s "Peach Flower Font" ["Peach Flower Spring"] is clear.