Chador


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Chador

 

a white, blue, or, sometimes, black covering in which Muslim women used to wrap themselves from head to foot when they left the house. Only the eyes remained uncovered. The criador was worn by a number of peoples in Iran, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, and the Arab countries, including Yemen and Iraq. It was used mainly in the cities. The chador is still worn by some women in Iran, Afghanistan, and certain Arab countries.

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What she did not understand was how her mistress had gone to visit a great man but had returned with a messy chador and uncovered face.
The head scarves worn by more liberal women- -instead of the complete, conservative, chador outfit--are also blossoming into bright colors and patterns.
Caption: BEGS TO DIFFER--This woman in Mashhad says she loves her chador but doesn't think women should be forced to follow a dress code.
Sisters In Chanel And Chador: Darlington Media Workshop in Darlington Arts Centre from Sat, Sept 27, to Sat, Nov 22.
But are we in the West radically misinterpreting Muslim sexual mores, particularly the meaning to many Muslim women of being veiled or wearing the chador? And are we blind to our own markers of the oppression and control of women?
At a Muslim women's centre last week volunteers, staff and clients spanned the full spectrum of Islamic dress from bare heads to full black chadors with only small slits for the eyes.
My first sight of Iran was at the airport, where half the Customs officers were female, only part of their faces visible as they examine passports in their chadors (the word literally means ``tent'' and that's what they look like).
Since 1983 in Iran women have been obliged by law to wear the chador.
But throughout yesterday's 90-minute session she showed our photographer the red card and held on tight to her traditional Iranian ladies' kit, the chador.
In the name of modernization, the shah had outlawed the chador, the traditional covering that Iran's conservative Muslim clerics say all women should wear.
But Nazie, whose ears were attuned to the hissing grease, stood calmly, wiping her hands on the ends of her chador, which absorbed the flour and oil between her fingers.