Chagas' disease


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Chagas' disease,

disease of South and Central America caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It usually affects children and young adults and is transmitted by the feces of infected insects, typically the assassin bugassassin bug,
common name for members of the family Reduviidae, one of the largest and most varied groups belonging to the order Hemiptera (suborder Heteroptera). Assassin bugs are generally brownish to black, medium-sized to large insects, with heads that are elongate and
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. Most of those infected have mild symptoms, such as fever and swelling and redness around the eyes, but from 10% to 30% develop chronic disease that may result in serious or fatal inflammation of the brain and heart tissues; persons with the disease also have an increased risk for stroke as they age as a result of heart problems. There is no vaccine and no satisfactory treatment. The incidence of Chagas' disease in the United States has increased since the 1970s, possibly because of increased immigration from Mexico and Central America, where the incidence is very high. In immunosuppressed patients (see AIDSAIDS
or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome,
fatal disease caused by a rapidly mutating retrovirus that attacks the immune system and leaves the victim vulnerable to infections, malignancies, and neurological disorders. It was first recognized as a disease in 1981.
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) Chagas' disease can form a mass in the cranial cavity that mimics a tumor, presumably because the lymphocytes that guard against the parasite are the same that are depleted by the AIDS virus. See also trypanosometrypanosome
, microscopic, one-celled protozoan of the genus Trypanosoma, typically living as an active parasite in the bloodstream of a vertebrate; hundreds of species are known. A trypanosome is long and pointed and possesses a flagellum.
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Chagas' disease

[′shäg·əs di‚zēz]
(medicine)
An acute and chronic protozoan disease of humans caused by the hemoflagellate Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi. Also known as South American trypanosomiasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Configuring a greater limitation to the Chagas' disease patient, in relation to the development of normal activities, the cardiac form was associated to decreased well-being and commitment in the execution of labor activities and in the achievement of income necessary for survival (10).
(3.3) What barriers do you consider limit access to the diagnosis of Chagas' disease in Colombia?
Romano et al., "In situ expression of regulatory cytokines by heart inflammatory cells in Chagas' disease patients with heart failure," Clinical and Developmental Immunology, vol.
Dr Jose Fiandor of GSK said: "The collaboration with the University of Dundee and this funding from Wellcome are vital boosts towards the achievement of our five-year goal of producing new preclinical candidates for leishmaniasis and Chagas' disease."
Seroepidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas' disease, in US blood donors.
[14] WHO Expert Committee on the Control of Chagas Disease, "Control of Chagas' disease: second report of the WHO expert committee [meeting held in Buenos Aires from 16 to 20 October 1989]," WHO Tecnical Report Series 905, WHO Library Cataloguing-In-Publication Data, Brasilia, Brasi, 1991.
The CHICO study (Chagas disease In Children treated with NifurtimOx) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of a newly developed formulation of Nifurtimox and shorter treatment durations of 60 and 30 days in comparison with non-treated pediatric patients with Chagas' disease.
Preclinical monitoring of drug association in experimental chemotherapy of Chagas' disease by a new HPL C-UV method.
(3) This article explores the political, social, and scientific interactions that allowed for the recognition of Chagas' disease as endemic in Argentina.
Using S35-S36 and TcH2AF-R primer-based PCR tests to follow-up a Chagas' disease patient who had undergone a heart transplant.