Chaga

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Chaga

 

a fungus of the family Polyporaceae that develops as a growth on the trunks of trees, mainly birch. Befungin, an extract of chaga, is used for the treatment of certain gastrointestinal diseases and is administered as a tonic. It sometimes alleviates the condition of patients with malignant tumors.

References in periodicals archive ?
Recent Trends in Chagga Political Development (Moshi: KNCU Printing Press).
In order to plant these new varieties, the residents of Chagga Gardens would have to remove the surrounding vegetation.
Chagga is nicked by Costa cops Lyons henchman in drug arrest From Page One cocaine and cannabis seized by cops on the Costa Blanca was destined for the Lyons mob and their Glasgow underworld empire.
The submontane forest belt of the southern and eastern slopes, between 1100 and 1800 m, has been converted to coffee-banana fields, the "Chagga home gardens", a special type of agroforestry.
What might be legitimate attempts to incorporate ethnic and cultural aspects of people like the Chagga (Gutmann) and the Kate (Keysser) in the manner sketched out by Warneck, was used by Afrikaner theologians to bolster a separate ethnic approach to black Africans which denied the catholicity of a mixed-race congregation and became for Bosch "totally incompatible" with the community of Jesus.
726), and ngoso among Chagga (Moore, 1976), are critically tied to maturity concepts.
MORAL DEMOGRAPHIES IN TOWN AND COUNTRY But it is true that today, Chagga culture has crumbled and is dead.
The narrator ponders large questions (the significance of animals, dreams, tribal and sexual things, magic and rituals); he is familiar with several prime movers (Gitche Manitou, Jesus, Allah) and a variety of languages and cultures (Spanish, Italian, English, North American, Masai, Wakamba, Lumbwa, Chagga).
Other examples of self-help may be found among the Chagga of
Like the Chinese jesters, those of the Chagga tribe of Africa would use impromptu skits with mocking songs to correct behaviour.
Both she and Bwana Mafue suggested that schooling contributed to girls' moral decline, and their comments clued me into some of the ways educated young women, more so than young men, were construed through some lines of social discourse as a threat to the normative order and Chagga tradition.