Chaim Weizmann


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Related to Chaim Weizmann: David Ben Gurion, Theodor Herzl

Weizmann, Chaim

(khīm` vīts`män), 1874–1952, scientist and Zionist leader, first president (1948–52) of Israel, b. Russia, grad. Univ. of Freiburg, 1899. He lectured in chemistry at the Univ. of Geneva (1901–3) and later taught at the Univ. of Manchester. Active in ZionismZionism,
modern political movement for reconstituting a Jewish national state in Palestine. Early Years

The rise of the Zionist movement in the late 19th cent.
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 from his youth, Weizmann first visited Palestine in 1907. He became a British subject in 1910, and in World War I he was (1916–19) director of the British admiralty laboratories. He became famous when he developed a synthetic acetone to be used in the manufacture of explosives. In 1917 he helped procure the pro-Zionist declaration of Arthur James BalfourBalfour, Arthur James Balfour, 1st earl of
, 1848–1930, British statesman; nephew of the 3d marquess of Salisbury.
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. A founder of so-called synthetic Zionism, Weizmann supported grass-roots colonization efforts as well as higher-level diplomatic activity. After 1920 he assumed leadership in the world Zionist movement, serving twice (1920–31, 1935–46) as president of the World Zionist Organization. In World War II he was (1939–45) honorary adviser to the British ministry of supply and did research on synthetic rubber and high-octane gasoline. When the republic of Israel was founded (1948), Weizmann became the first president. At Rehoboth, where he lived, Weizmann founded a research institute (now the Weizmann Institute of Science). He wrote many papers for scientific journals. Ezer WiezmanWeizman, Ezer
, 1924–2005, Israeli military officer and politician, president of Israel (1993–2000), b. Tel Aviv. A nephew of Chaim Weizmann, he helped found the Israeli air force, serving in it from 1948 to 1966 and rising to the rank of major general and commanding
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 is his nephew.

Bibliography

See his autobiography (1949); his letters and papers (3 vol., 1968–72); biography ed. by M. W. Weisgal and J. Carmichael (1962); studies by I. Berlin (1958) and I. Kolatt (1970); P. Goodman, ed., Chaim Weizmann: A Tribute (1959).

Weizmann, Chaim

 

Born Nov. 27, 1874, near Pinsk; died Nov. 9, 1952, in Rehovot, Israel. Governmental figure of Israel. Born into the family of a lumber merchant.

Weizmann received his education in Russia, Germany, and Switzerland and was a professor of chemistry. He lived in Britain from 1903 until the end of World War II. Weizmann was a leader of the Zionist movement. He was president of the World Zionist Organization from 1920 to 1931 and from 1935 to 1946, and of the Jewish Agency for Palestine from 1929 to 1931 and from 1935 to 1946. He was the first president of the state of Israel (1948-52).

References in periodicals archive ?
1 (1990): 30-31; Jehuda Reinharz, Chaim Weizmann: The Making of a Statesman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993), 320-365.
Chaim Weizmann wrote to Churchill protesting that "the fields of Gilead, Moab and Edom [east of the Jordan]…are historically and geographically and economically linked to Palestine, and it is upon these fields, now that the rich plains of the north have been taken from Palestine and given to France, that the success of the Jewish National Home must largely rest…."
2, 1917) was a statement issued by the British foreign secretary, Arthur James Balfour, in a letter to Lionel Walter Rothschild, a leader of British Jewry, as urged by the Russian Jewish Zionist leaders Chaim Weizmann and Nahum Sokolow.
Martin Buber and Chaim Weizmann played a critical role in its creation; it was placed in Haifa in part because Theodor Herzl had envisioned the northern city as "a great park.
Lawrence of Arabia, who led the British-sponsored Arab Revolt against the Turks, is as a central to the Schneer's narrative as is Chaim Weizmann, the British Zionist leader and renowned scientist who led the diplomatic campaign to enlist Great Britain's support for a Jewish Homeland in Palestine.
In Yonatan Silverman's article on NIH (Fall 2010 edition), he refers to Chaim Weizmann's belief that NIH had an important role to play in the Zionist Movement, particularly with respect to forming an alliance with the British.
Emerging as Zionist leader was Chaim Weizmann, a Russian-born chemist whose discovery of a fermentation method for a key ingredient in explosives was important to the war effort and helped win him contact with David Lloyd George before he became British prime minister.
Meanwhile, Lord Weidenfeld wrote an article entitled "Two Rights and Two Wrongs", in which he quoted Chaim Weizmann, the first Israeli president, by saying: "The Jewish-Palestinian problem is not a conflict of right and wrong, but one of two rights and two wrongs...Our wrong is the smaller one."
(Chaim Weizmann, Published in Judische Rundschau, No.
Chaim Weizmann was the first President of what country?
After gaining immense fame for his scientific breakthroughs, he was offered the presidency of Israel in 1952 after the death of the country's first president, Chaim Weizmann. In reality, while Einstein was sympathetic to the Zionist cause, he repeatedly warned that a "narrow nationalism" may arise if a Jewish-only state was founded and peaceful co-existence with the Palestinians was not achieved.