Chaleur Bay


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Chaleur Bay

(shəlo͝or`), inlet of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, c.85 mi (140 km) long and from 15 to 25 mi (24–40 km) wide, between N N.B. and the Gaspé Peninsula, E Que., Canada. It is the submerged valley of the Restigouche River, which enters at its head. Chaleur Bay is a famous fishing ground for cod, herring, mackerel, and salmon, and there are many Acadian fishing villages on both coasts. Jacques CartierCartier, Jacques
, 1491–1557, French navigator, first explorer of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and discoverer of the St. Lawrence River. He made three voyages to the region, the first two (1534, 1535–36) directly at the command of King Francis I and the third
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, who was the first European to visit (1534) the bay, named it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loewen and Egana Goya (2014) have translated and examined the Chaleur Bay portion of the Basque-language pilot book by Detcheverry.
The site is situated 4 km west of Shippagan, along Chaleur Bay in the northeastern tip of New Brunswick.
If Cook is making a point with this spelling, why did he not note that Cartier may have heard a Portuguese pidgin (trade language) when Micmac canoes approached his vessel plying the waters of Chaleur Bay in 1534?
These ships fanned out to ports in Cape Breton Island, Chaleur Bay, southern Newfoundland, and Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, as well as western Newfoundland as far as the Bay of Islands.
While Hoyarsabal covered the coasts of southern and eastern Newfoundland, Detcheverry omitted much of eastern Newfoundland and added original descriptions of western Newfoundland and Chaleur Bay, where Basques had begun fishing in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries (Barkham, 1989; Loewen and Egana Goya, 2014).
Based on an estimated subtotal of 25 to 30 ships in Cape Breton, Chaleur Bay, and western Newfoundland, (5) we may judge the number of Basque outfits in southern Newfoundland and Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon at somewhere between 45 and 60.
(3) In Chaleur Bay, according to Detcheverry, Port-Daniel (Cheguen) acted as an overflow drying beach for fishermen stationed at Paspebiac.