Chaliapin


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Chaliapin

Fyodor Ivanovich . 1873--1938, Russian operatic bass singer
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon his second visit to Japan, the Imperial Hotel sought his permission to introduce the dish as part of its special menu under the title "Chaliapin Steak".
This initial encounter with Chaliapin's name and art made a lifelong mark on my child's soul.
npg.si.edu Boris Chaliapin illustrated more than 400 covers for Time magazine from 1942 to 1970.
That wonderfully-informed impresario, Serge de Diaghilev brought Russian ballet and opera to the West and with dazzling theatre spectacles (Scheherazade, Boris Godanov) brilliant dancers and singer (Nijinsky, Karsavina, Chaliapin), equally brilliant composers (Rimsky-Korsakov, Tchaikovsky), they changed European perceptions of Russia forever, ushering that huge continent and certain its people into a kind of artistic League of Nations.
Elisabeth Bykhenova, director of the Chaliapin Center, in Boston, said that "everyone who comes here (to the museum) feels part of Russia here.
Rachmaninov's short opera, The Miserly Knight, has a second scene written for the voice of the great bass Chaliapin. On a new disc from Chandos the Russian bass Ildar Abdrazokov sings the part with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, under Gianandrea Noseda.
Yet they are remembered as some of the greatest character actors in the movies, among them Akim Tamiroff, Vladimir Sokoloff, Mischa Auer, Maria Ouspenskaya, Gregory Ratoff, Michael Chekhov, and Fyodor Chaliapin, Jr.
You'd attended concerts of Russian music that this visionary impresario had presented in Paris in 1907, and been thrilled in 1908 by the great Russian bass Fyodor Chaliapin in Modest Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov at the Paris Opera--another step in Diaghilev's mission to acquaint western Europe with Russian culture.
(98) The film's director, Ratoff, along with its cast, including the famed stage and screen actor Michael Chekhov, as well as a number of established character actors (e.g., Vladimir Sokoloff and Feodor Chaliapin, Jr.), had direct knowledge of Soviet Russia, since they had emigrated in the 1920s.