Chamaedaphne


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Chamaedaphne

 

(also Cassandra), a genus of evergreen shrubs of the family Ericaceae. The plants are 17 to 100 cm tall. The leathery leaves and the branchlets are covered on both sides with peltate scales. The flowers are white, gamopetalous, urceolate-campanulate, and drooping; they are gathered in unilateral leafy racemes at the ends of the branches. The fruit is a capsule. The genus has one species—the leatherleaf (C. calyculata) —which grows in Northern Eurasia, North America (as far south as the Allegheny Mountains), and, less commonly, Japan. The leatherleaf is typical of tundras and upstream, mainly sphagnum, swamps; it is also found in damp forests and along rivers and lakes. The leaves and young shoots contain the glycoside andromedotoxin, which is poisonous to sheep and goats.

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shrubby cinquefoil) in the fen and Chamaedaphne calyculata (L.
The rhizospheres of several species examined at multiple sites were NA positive regardless of habitat: Carex lacustris, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Typha angustifolia, and Vaccinium macracarpon (Table 1).
Associates include Betula pumila, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Thelypteris palustris, Hypericum virginicum, Menyanthes trifoliata, Potentilla palustris, Sarracenia purpurea, Vaccinium macrocarpon, and V.
This insertion is apparently also present in the Lyonia clade, as well as in Chamaedaphne, Pieris nana, and Agarista populifol ia.
While characteristically northern species such as Chamaedaphne calyculata, Andromeda glaucophylla, and Carex oligosperma often make "southern outlier peatlands" conspicuous to botanists, studies of such peatlands in New York, New Jersey and southern Michigan have shown a flora exhibiting mixed geographic affinity (Crow 1969; Lynn & Karlin 1985; Karlin & Lynn 1988).