Chamaeleon


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Related to Chamaeleon: Chamaeleo chamaeleon

Chamaeleon

(kă-mee -lee-ŏn) A small inconspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere near Crux, the brightest stars being of 4th magnitude. Abbrev.: Cha; genitive form: Chamaeleontis; approx. position: RA 11h, dec –80°; area: 132 sq deg.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chamaeleon

 

a constellation near the south celestial pole. It contains no stars brighter than a visual stellar magnitude of 4.0. It is not visible in the USSR.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Chamaeleon

[kə′mēl·yən]
(astronomy)
A constellation, right ascension 11 hours, declination 80°S. Abbreviated Cha. Also spelled Chameleon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The starry Chamaeleon stares into the night sky with two wide-open eyes, so to speak, represented by the magnitude 4 alpha and magnitude 4.3 theta Chamaeleontis, situated in the far western extreme of the constellation.
Luhman (Penn State University) and six collaborators have found a disk around a very-lowmass brown dwarf in Chamaeleon. Given the brown dwarf's estimated 2-million-year age and feeble infrared luminosity, theoretical models peg its mass between 5 and 15 Jupiters.
However, Chamaeleon contains another remarkable deep-sky object.
Several cases have been reported; the best is GRB 011121, a burst that went off last November 21st in Chamaeleon. Teams led by Joshua S.
The best examples of stars displaying them are HD 97048 in the Chamaeleon dark cloud and Elias 1 in the Taurus dark cloud.
It's a small, inconspicuous group, composed mostly of faint red dwarfs, in the constellation Chamaeleon near the south celestial pole.
Lost amid glorious surroundings, Chamaeleon is easy to overlook.
Rosat observations of star-forming regions in the Orion Nebula, the gas clouds in Chamaeleon, the Pleiades, and the Hyades provide dazzling confirmation of these expectations.
Hydrus the Water Serpent and Chamaeleon the Chameleon were both contrived at the tend of the 16th century by the Dutch navigators Frederick de Houtman and Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser.