Chamber


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chamber

1. a reception room or audience room in an official residence, palace, etc.
2. 
a. a legislative, deliberative, judicial, or administrative assembly
b. any of the houses of a legislature
3. the space between two gates of the locks of a canal, dry dock, etc.
4. Obsolete a place where the money of a government, corporation, etc., was stored; treasury
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Chamber

A room used for private living, conversation, consultation or deliberation, in contrast to more public and formal activities.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chamber

 

(or breast), in mining, a relatively short mine working with a large cross section. The dimensions and the characteristics of location, construction, and operation of chambers are determined by their purpose.

The term “chamber” includes workings used for the place-ment of equipment and special shaft or mine services (an under-ground electric power substation, pumphouse, catch basin, electric locomotive depot, control room, medical station, orwaiting room), excavations for the mining of minerals by theunderground method, and special-purpose underground structures (underground engine rooms of hydroelectric power plants; subway concourses).


Chamber

 

(1) The name of representative bodies or constituent parts thereof. For example, in the USSR the Supreme Soviet of the USSR consists of two equal chambers, the Soviet of the Union and the Soviet of Nationalities.

(2) The name of certain state or public organizations and establishments—for example, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Book Chamber.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chamber

[′chām·bər]
(civil engineering)
The space in a canal lock between the upper and lower gates.
(graphic arts)
A sleeve or channel of a transparent film jacket.
(mining engineering)
The working place of a miner.
A body of ore with definite boundaries apparently filling a preexisting cavern.
(ordnance)
The part of the gun in which the charge is placed: in a revolver, the hole in the cylinder; in a cannon, the space between the obturator or breechblock and the forcing cone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chamber

1. A room used for private living, conversation, consultation, or deliberation, in contrast to more public and formal activities. Also see bedroom, boudoir, cabinet, closet, den, parlor, solar, study.
2. A room for such use which has acquired public importance, e.g., the senate chamber, an audience chamber.
3. (Brit., pl.) A suite of rooms for private dwelling.
4. (pl.) A suite of rooms for deliberation and consultation (juristic).
5. A space equipped or designed for a special function, mechanical or technological, e.g., a torture chamber, a combustion chamber.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The chambers are lighted by diffused sunlight reflected through tubes similar to those by which the avenues are lighted.
When you entered your chamber, mademoiselle, you immediately shut the door and locked and bolted it?
A man was in my chamber. He sprang at me and tried to strangle me.
Again she spoke to them, but in tones so low I could not catch the words, and then she started toward the opposite side of the chamber with the six mighty monsters trailing at heel.
Again and again we turned from one door to another, from the baffling golden panel at one end of the chamber to its mate at the other--equally baffling.
Within the chamber Gahan saw Tara of Helium in the clutches of a mighty body, while close to the wall upon the opposite side of the apartment crouched the hideous, spider-like Luud.
Luud saw Ghek following the strange warrior into the chamber. "Strike him down, Ghek!" commanded the king.
Carefully feeling about, he found himself within a large chamber, along the walls of which, and down the length of the floor, were piled many tiers of metal ingots of an odd though uniform shape.
Down into the chamber he dragged me, and across it to the side opposite that at which we had entered.
Boxtel, who saw all this whilst hiding himself on the landing-place of the staircase above, descended step by step from his story as Rosa descended from hers; so that, when she touched with her light foot the lowest step of the staircase, Boxtel touched with a still lighter hand the lock of Rosa's chamber.
To experiment with my new-found toy I thought to surprise him into revealing this combination and so I asked him in a casual manner how he had managed to unlock the massive doors for me from the inner chambers of the building.
Chambers did his stealing, and got the peach stones, apple cores, and melon rinds for his share.