Chamorros


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Chamorros

 

the indigenous population of the Mariana Islands, in Western Micronesia. Decimated in the 17th century by Spanish colonists, the Chamorros spoke a Malayo-Polynesian language. They engaged in land cultivation and were evidently at the stage of the disintegration of the primitive communal system. A small number of the surviving Chamorros intermarried with the Spanish and with the Filipinos and Mexicans serving in the Spanish armed forces. The name “Chamorros” is now applied to the resulting group, which is made up of métis and has retained the old language. According to a 1971 estimate, the Chamorros number approximately 65,000. They engage primarily in land cultivation and are nearly all Roman Catholics.

REFERENCES

Narody Avstraliii Okeanii. Moscow, 1956. (Bibliography, p. 791.)
Puchkov, P. I. Naselenie Okeanii. Moscow, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, as any Guamanian or Chamorro would say, it's never about the size.
In 1669, a year after they arrived, San Vitores reported that there were no distilled spirits in Guam and that the Chamorros drank only rice water with shredded coconut, despite the shipwrecked Filipinos who had lived there for 23 years.
Como tratare de demostrar en este ensayo los chamorros no fueron simples victimas del colonialismo, sino que se apropiaron de las costumbres y creencias foraneas, para incorporarlas a las suyas propias.
He suggested that the "strong sense of shame carried by Chamorros" is connected to an infinite sense of reciprocity with others.
Cultural, economic and social interactions between the Chamorros of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands would inevitably be influenced by German ways.
Guam is a spiritual place where Chamorros believe in a vigorous spiritual presence melded with Catholic dogma taught by the earliest Spanish missionaries.
Although the sample size for Chamorros and Filipinos is smaller than the other sample populations, the data support that these loci are highly polymorphic in these groups as well.
Schmookler's 'parable of the tribes' as an organizing theme for the fate of the Chamorros. In summarizing this thesis, Rogers suggests, 'A central irony of the struggles of the Chamorro people against Europeans is that, in order to mount a successful defense, the islanders had to become like the outsiders' (40).
Spencer's group suspected the palm seeds partly because the Chamorros used them extensively as food (rice was scarce) and as a topical medicine during the Japanese occupation of the islands between 1941 and 1944, but the seeds later fell out of favor.