Aucassin and Nicolette

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Aucassin and Nicolette

the love story of 12th-century France. [Fr. Lit.: Aucassin and Nicolette]
References in periodicals archive ?
short story, drama, chantefable, and oral depositions for education and propaganda purposes.
Jacobs introduced his series with Andrew Lang's abiding Song-Stories of Aucassin and Nicolete, an anonymous twelfth- or thirteenth-century French chantefable and, more abiding still, Matthew Arnold's Tristram and Iseult.
Aucassin & Nicolette; a chantefable from the twelfth-century minstrels; a facing-page translation.
Here again, the voyage-eclair is accomplished in a line or two, although one could hardly describe the charming chantefable as epic; thus: 'Li nes u Aucassins estoit ala par mer waucrant qu'ele ariva au castel de Biaucaire; et les gens du pais cururent au lagan, si troverent Aucassin, si le reconurent' [.
Some scholars have attempted to find analogies in the music of the chantefable (such as Aucassin et Nicolette), and various other narratives with extant music have been adduced as evidence pertinent to the chanson de geste, but, as Siciliano rightly points out, Aucassin et Nicolette has nothing to do with the form, and the same is true of the other supposed analogues.
Although the emphasis is not on notation (only the xylophone chapter and the chantefable chapter have notations with them), the notations that are used are adaptations geared specifically to the genre being discussed, and serve as excellent models to inspire further developments of this sort.
Aucassin et Nicolette Early 13th-century French chantefable (a story told in alternating sections of verse and prose, the former sung, the latter recited) preserved in a single manuscript in France's Bibliotheque Nationale.
1983), 23-49, where she notes that in the transformation text the main events of the story are established and that later chantefable literature, such as the later two versions of the Precious Scroll on the Three Lives of Mulian (late Yuan or early Ming), follow or expand the transformation text version.
If the story is moderately long, we have a chantefable (a tale in which the narrator uses spoken sequences alternated with songs).
The word itself was used--and perhaps coined--by the anonymous author of the 13th-century French work Aucassin et Nicolette in its concluding lines: "No cantefable prent fin" ("Our chantefable is drawing to a close").
There are also an annotated list of the chantefable narratives, a glossary of Chinese terms, and ten plates reproducing the original texts.