chantry

(redirected from Chantry chapel)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Chantry chapel: Chantry priest, chantries

chantry

A chapel within a church, endowed for religious services for the soul of the donor or others he may designate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beyond the choir there were further chapels, including chantry chapels for private masses.
50) The chantry chapel enclosing the Tong monument, which was founded by Sir Henry Vernon, was not completed until 1517.
This riverside community includes a 14th century chantry chapel with delicate but blackened tracery, red brick warehouses with fading white-washed signage and a boatyard busy with the clatter of workmen.
The Victorians left little behind from the older church apart from the tower, the door (which is now propped irrelevantly against a wall) and the chantry chapel at the far end of the south aisle.
Award-winning architect David Chipperfield has designed a building which to some looks prosaic on the outside, with its grey concrete, but inside there's a concrete expression of his skills in the 10 galleries which now house such an interesting heritage of art - from early drawings of the famous Chantry Chapel, almost opposite the riverside Hepworth, through a plethora of Barbara Hepworth's sculptures and on to an exhibition of contemporary sculpture by Eva Rothschild.
Prince Arthur's chantry chapel was one of the most magnificent ever made in England, but an effigy for the tomb was never made.
But it's down by the riverside, on a site almost opposite the famous Chantry Chapel on the Calder, that the new gallery - to be known as The Hepworth - is being built.
Nonsense: it is inconceivable that the scholarly and respectful Scott would have demolished the detached bell-tower or the chantry chapels at Salisbury or attempted to sweep away the Galilee Chapel at Durham (in both cases for the ineffable Bishop Shute Barrington).
The first part looks at work done on churches in the diocese of Le Mans in the late sixteenth century and on Lutheran churches in Schleswig as well as nineteenth-century chantry chapels, immigrant churches in Norwich and the Huguenot influence.
The Trinity Chapel (1357) and the later Founders Chapel (1397) are both chantry chapels - church spaces dedicated to masses for the founder's soul - a common feature of the 14th century, presumably as a response to the Black Death that advanced through Britain and in particular through the gates of Gloucester between 1348 and 1350.
And there''s a marvellous contrast between the chantry chapels - occupied by medieval prelates who had the spare cash to endow an Oxbridge college - and a humble bronze of William Walker, a diver whose heroic work early in the 20th century saved the cathedral from subsiding into the Itchen floodplain.