Chapaevsk

Chapaevsk

 

(until 1929, Ivashchenkovo), a city (since 1927) under oblast jurisdiction in Kuibyshev Oblast, RSFSR. Located on the right bank of the Chapaevka River, a tributary of the Volga. Railroad station on the Syzran’-Kuibyshev line, 43 km southwest of Kuibyshev. Population, 87,000 (1976). Chapaevsk has a chemical-fertilizer plant, a silicates plant, a plant for the manufacture of reinforced-concrete products, a cannery, a milk plant, meat-packing and food-processing combines, a clothing factory, and a motor-vehicle transportation combine. Educational institutions include a chemical engineering technicum. Chapaevsk was named for V. I. Chapaev.

References in periodicals archive ?
The study was approved by the Human Studies Institutional Review Boards of the Chapaevsk Medical Association (Chapaevsk, Russia); Harvard T.H.
According to Russian news agency (Interfax) quoting emergency teams, a huge explosion rocked the ammunition depot in Chapaevsk town, followed by a number of explosions which injured 22 people, five of them were transferred to nearby hospital.
Oleg Sergeev is director, Chapaevsk Medical Association, Chapaevsh, Russia.
The Russian Children's Study is a prospective cohort study of 499 boys residing in Chapaevsk, Russia, enrolled in 2003-2005 at ages 8-9 years and followed annually through 2012-2014 to ages 17-18 years for this analysis (Hauser et al.
The Russian Children's Study is a prospective cohort study of 499 boys, enrolled at age 8-9 years in 2003-2005, residing in Chapaevsk, Russia, a community contaminated with organochlorine compounds, including OCPs (Burns et al.
We assessed predictors of serum HCB, [beta]-HCH, and p,p'-DDE concentrations among children residing in Chapaevsk, Russia, a city of approximately 72,000 people located 950 km southeast of Moscow that has a history of environmental organochlorine compound contamination.
From 2003-2005, we recruited 8- to 9-year-old boys in Chapaevsk, Russia, to participate in the Russian Children's Study, as previously described (Burns et al.