Charcot


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Charcot

Jean Martin . 1825--93, French neurologist, noted for his attempt using hypnotism to find an organic cause for hysteria, which influenced Freud

Charcot

 

a peninsula in the northwestern part of Alexander I Land (69°45’ S lat., 75°15’ W long.), in Western Antarctica. Washed by the Bellingshausen Sea, the Charcot Peninsula is connected to the continental land mass by the Wilkins Ice Shelf. The peninsula, which has an area of approximately 2,700 sq km, is almost completely covered by a glacier, whose surface lies 270 m above sea level. In the northwestern part of the peninsula the surface of the glacier is broken by mountain peaks rising to an elevation of 609 m at Mount Monique. The peninsula was discovered in 1910 by the French antarctic expedition of J.-B. Charcot and was named in honor of the explorer’s father.

References in periodicals archive ?
(39) In the lecture published as "A propos d'un cas d'hysterie masculine," Charcot states that "hysteria is one and indivisible and ...
"Charcot described hysteria as 'a functional nervous disorder most frequent in young women, accompanied by extreme emotional excitability and loss of will power'," Jill Dowse said.
Charcot distinguishes degrees of arm paralysis - two slaps suffice to freeze the entire limb for analysis.
The Charcot group showed significantly reduced corneal nerve branch density (117.16/[mm.sup.2]) compared to the control group (187.45/[mm.sup.2] in the control group (p = 0.049, d = 0.81)).
We present the case of a 52-year-old female patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus type 2 who suffered a bimalleolar fracture of the right ankle and developed a Charcot arthropathy.
However during Jean-Marie Charcot's time at Salpetriere -- which rose to fame under his headship -- he did somewhat reform the treatment of women who were diagnosed with hysteria.
Several studies have reported changes in biomarkers of bone resorption and inflammation in individuals with Charcot foot [17-24], and it seems that the inflammation leads to microstructural changes in the affected bones [25,26].
We have performed THA on two patients with charcot hip joints due to congenital insensivity to pain with anhydrosis.
For her recent solo exhibition "Soft Colony" (its title a reference to a conversation between the artist and a white female writer who referred to herself in passing as a "soft colonizer," and to Williams's subsequent investigations into the ways in which women participate in their own subjugation), Kandis Williams showed a series of photomontages that directly compare Charcot's images of feminine "hysterics" with counterparts from the more recent past: Fiona Apple in languid repose in the music video for "Criminal"; Kate Bush leaping into the air like a bat on the back cover of a 1980 LP; a vampiric Sadie Frost hissing in Bram Stoker's Dracula--the list goes on.
One of the great European physicians of the era was Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), regarded together with Guillaume B.A.
Charcot Marie Tooth (CMT) disease, also known as Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy (HMSN) refers to a group of disorders characterized by a chronic motor and sensory polyneuropathy.
Self-referral to an orthopedist established a diagnosis of Charcot's foot for which she underwent immobilization and an Achilles tendon elongation.