Chardin


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Chardin

Jean-Baptiste Siméon . 1699-- 1779, French still-life and genre painter, noted for his subtle use of scumbled colour
References in periodicals archive ?
So even when we're discouraged, Teilhard de Chardin can give us hope in chaos.
Another designer at Chardin, Richard Pulatche, said they have to send the fabrics for the President's approval before they start working on his jeans.
It includes chapters on "An Evolving Christian Morality," "Teilhard de Chardin and the New Spirituality," and Teilhard as "The Empirical Mystic," which might now be my favorite description of this unique polymath.
The issue of Teilhard de Chardin continues to raise the interest of our readers.
In the pages of "Meister Eckhart: A Mystic-Warrior for Our Times, author and Western mysticism expert Matthew Fox creates metaphorical meetings between Eckhart and Teilhard de Chardin, Thich Nhat Hanh, Carl Jung, Black Elk, Rumi, Adrienne Rich, and other radical thinkers.
Other implications of human interthinking as a new advance in evolution have been projected by Teilhard de Chardin and by other speculative thinkers.
From Teilhard to Omega is a pick for religion and science readers alike and focuses on the works of French Jesuit and scientist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, whose studies blended a Christian perspective with a scientific focus: disciplines which ordinary don't merge well.
Holzapfel writes from a comparative perspective, accessing extensive archival research and drawing from close readings of iconic dramas and their productions such as Scribe's The Glass of Water and Ibsen's A Doll House, incorporating in-depth analysis of the artwork from major painters and photographers of the time including Chardin, Nadar, and Millais.
Among the highlights of this superb chapter are discussions of Vermeer, Chardin, the Goncourts and the fictional painter Elstir, all of whom teach the narrator the value of esthetic experience.
Marguerite Duras once commented that "Bresson's filmic immensity is contained as much in a single one of his images as in the entirety of all of his images," a truth nowhere more evident than in this nature mort, whose quietude, muted palette, and homely subject matter--fawn pot with chipped lid, squat metal basin, and empty bowl--recall the domestic still lifers of Chardin.
This two-part note concerns the pastel of 1775 by Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin (1699-1779), acquired by the Musee du Louvre in 1839, and alternatively known as "Self-Portrait" and "Portrait of Chardin Wearing an Eyeshade.