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Three contributions focus on specific movements in Africa or among the diaspora: Mikelle Smith Omari on Candomble in Brazil; Johannes Fabian on Jamaa, a charismatic revival movement in Zaire; and an article by Asmarom Legesse analyzing the concepts of alienation, communitas and charisma in the case of the Rastafarians, which Legesse calls a "prophetic movement without a prophet."
These were well established in Nigeria's educational institutions before the 1970s, having been introduced between 1937 and 1955, principally from Britain.(5) It was among these students, already exposed to liberal and conservative evangelical Christianity, that the charismatic revival gained root.
One year later, in 1975, historian David Edwin Harrell published his own pioneering work, All Things are Possible: The Healing and Charismatic Revivals in Modern America (Bloomington: Indiana University Press).
Harrell, All Things Are Possible--The Healing and Charismatic Revivals in Modern America (Bloomington: Indiana Univ.
The Healing & charismatic Revivals in Modern America, Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1975, p.
For examples of the interpretations to which I am responding, see David Edwin Harrell, Jr., All Things Are Possible: The Healing and Charismatic Revivals in Modern America (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975), 5; Cox, Fire From Heaven, 15.