Charles IX


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Charles IX,

1550–74, king of France. He succeeded (1560) his brother Francis IIFrancis II,
1768–1835, last Holy Roman emperor (1792–1806), first emperor of Austria as Francis I (1804–35), king of Bohemia and of Hungary (1792–1835).
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 under the regency of his mother, Catherine de' MediciCatherine de' Medici
, 1519–89, queen of France, daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, duke of Urbino. She was married (1533) to the duc d'Orléans, later King Henry II.
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. She retained her influence throughout his reign. After 1570, however, Charles was temporarily under the sway of the French Huguenot leader Gaspard de ColignyColigny, Gaspard de Châtillon, comte de
, 1519–72, French Protestant leader. A nephew of Anne, duc de Montmorency, he came to the French court at an early age.
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. Catherine, fearing for her power, persuaded her weak son to approve the massacre of Saint Bartholomew's DaySaint Bartholomew's Day, massacre of,
murder of French Protestants, or Huguenots, that began in Paris on Aug. 24, 1572. It was preceded, on Aug. 22, by an attempt, ordered by Catherine de' Medici, on the life of the Huguenot leader Admiral Coligny.
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 in which Coligny and thousands of other Huguenots were murdered. Charles IX was succeeded by his brother Henry IIIHenry III,
1551–89, king of France (1574–89); son of King Henry II and Catherine de' Medici. He succeeded his brother, Charles IX. As a leader of the royal army in the Wars of Religion (see Religion, Wars of) against the French Protestants, or Huguenots, Henry, then
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.

Charles IX,

1550–1611, king of Sweden (1604–11), youngest son of Gustavus I. He was duke of Södermanland, Närke, and Värmland before his accession. During the reign of his brother, John III (1568–92), he opposed John's leanings toward Catholicism. After John's death he acted as regent, summoned (1593) an assembly of clergy and nobles to Uppsala, and had it establish Lutheranism as the state religion. This measure was passed in anticipation of the arrival (1594) of John III's Catholic son and heir, King Sigismund IIISigismund III,
1566–1632, king of Poland (1587–1632) and Sweden (1592–99). The son of John III of Sweden and Catherine, sister of Sigismund II of Poland, he united the Vasa and Jagiello dynasties.
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 of Poland, who was obliged to pledge himself to uphold Protestantism in Sweden as a condition for his coronation. Sigismund left Sweden in the same year, and Charles summoned the Riksdag, was made regent against the king's wishes, and ousted all Catholic officials. The Swedish nobles were loyal to Sigismund, but the people supported Charles. Sigismund landed an army at Kalmar (1598), was defeated by Charles at Stangebro, and was deposed by the Riksdag in 1599. To consolidate his power Charles had most of his opponents executed, but he refused to accept the Swedish crown until Sigismund's brother, John, renounced it in 1604. In 1600 he invaded Livonia and thus began the long Polish-Swedish wars that ended only with the Peace of OlivaOliva, Peace of
, 1660, treaty signed at Oliva (now a suburb of Gdańsk) by Poland and Sweden. John II of Poland renounced the theoretical claim of his line to the Swedish crown, which his father, Sigismund III, had in practice lost in 1599.
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 in 1660. Charles's claim to Lapland involved him in the unsuccessful Kalmar War (1611–13) with Christian IVChristian IV,
1577–1648, king of Denmark and Norway (1588–1648), son and successor of Frederick II. After assuming (1596) personal rule from a regency, he concentrated on building the navy, industry, and commerce. He rebuilt Oslo and renamed it Christiania.
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 of Denmark. He died before the conclusion of the war and was succeeded by his son, Gustavus II.

Charles IX

1550--74, king of France (1560--74), son of Catherine de' Medici and Henry II: his reign was marked by war between Huguenots and Catholics
References in periodicals archive ?
Enfin, le mot meme du "destin" chez Ronsard - "Je veux qu'il aille ou son destin l'appelle" (153)--ne passe pas inapercu de Cahaignes qui n'hesite pas a preciser que ce double sceptre n'est rien de moins que l'obligation du destin (fato) envers le l'heritier royal de Charles IX. La perspective alteree, imposee brutalement par la mort prematuree de "Charles le Grand" premier dedicataire de l'epopee ronsardienne, n'empeche pas l'epigrammatiste des palinods normands de suivre rigoureusement le texte de sa principale reference dans la confection de l'eloge marial.
Although with the exception of the defunct Charles IX the major characters in the second half are those of the first half, all of whom were involved in the massacre in some way, none of these characters mentions the massacre directly and specifically, even when presented with the occasion to do so.
The moment when she witnessed the poisoning of Charles IX was the climax of Brotons's performance.
"It's been going since 1564 when France's Charles IX brought in the new Gregorian calendar, changing new year from April 1 to January 1.
Who was the mother of the French kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III?
The history of April Fool's Day or All Fool's Day is uncertain, but the current thinking is that it began around 1582 in France with the reform of the calendar under Charles IX.
Her second son, aged ten, succeeded as King Charles IX. He, as weak and unhealthy as his defunct brother, would "reign" for fourteen years, but his mother remained the true monarch.
It discusses the response of three kidnapped Tupinambas who were presented to Charles IX in 1562.
As precious external sources confirm, Dionisio preached this message for quite some time, especially in Paris, in the guise of a "fool" and self-proclaimed "king of the Gauls." Later Dionisio reported that he also had the ear of King Charles IX and his court, exhorting the king to lead the defense of Christian unity.
Until France's Charles IX imposed the Gregorian calendar, what event did medieval Europeans associate with April 1?
Ramee, "qu'en 1563, lors de l'enregistrement des Lettres patentes de Charles IX pour la reformation du luxe, le parlement arreta que le roi serait supplie de defendre les coches par la ville" (La locomotion, p.
April Fools Day is believed to have started in 1564 when King Charles IX of France adopted the Gregorian calendar, shifting New Year celebrations from April 1 to January 1.Anyone who forgot was ridiculed by being sent foolish gifts and invitations to non- existent parties.