Charles Martel


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Charles Martel

(märtĕl`) [O.Fr.,=Charles the Hammer], 688?–741, Frankish ruler, illegitimate son of Pepin of HeristalPepin of Heristal
(Pepin II) , d. 714, mayor of the palace (680–714) of the Frankish territory of Austrasia; grandson of Pepin of Landen and father of Charles Martel.
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 and grandfather of Charlemagne. After the death of his father (714) he seized power in Austrasia from Pepin's widow, who was ruling as regent for her grandsons, and became mayor of the palace. He subsequently subdued the W Frankish kingdom of Neustria and began the reconquest of Burgundy, Aquitaine, and Provence. Charles Martel defeated the Spanish Muslims at the battle of Tours (732–33) and began the military campaigns that reestablished the Franks as the rulers of Gaul. Although he never assumed the title of king, he divided the Frankish lands, like a king, between his sons Pepin the Short and Carloman.

Bibliography

See F. Lot, The End of the Ancient World and the Beginnings of the Middle Ages (1927, tr. 1961); E. James, The Origins of France: Clovis and the Capetians, A.D. 500–1000 (1982).

Charles Martel

 

(Carolus Martellus). Born c. 688; died Oct. 22, 741, at Quierzy. Mayor of the palace of the Merovingian Frankish state (715–). Son of Pepin of Herstal of the Pepinid clan (later called the Carolingians).

In defeating the nobility of Neustria and Aquitaine and reestablishing the political unity of the Frankish kingdom, Charles Martel in effect concentrated supreme power in his own hands under the last kings of the Merovingian dynasty. In order to continue the centralization of the state and militarily strengthen it, he did away with the previous system of giving land holdings as outright property and began extensively granting land, called benefices, on the basis of conditional tenure; he created a land fund for distribution to the beneficiaries by confiscating the holdings of insubordinate magnates and extensively secularizing church lands. His reforms were an important phase in the development of feudal relations in the Frankish state. Victorious over the Muslims in the battle near Poitiers (732), he subjugated the Frisians and Alemanni. His successes ensured the transition of royal power to the Carolingians (under his son Pepin the Short).

Charles Martel

grandfather of Charlemagne. ?688--741 ad, Frankish ruler of Austrasia (715--41), who checked the Muslim invasion of Europe by defeating the Moors at Poitiers (732)
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Hanson's successor Charles Martel later echoed him when he said that "the character of the collections, the special development in the Library of Congress of the historical and social sciences justified, nay required, the treatment and placing first of the humanistic group" (Martel 328).
Charles Martel earned the name "Martel," "the Hammer," by a series of military successes before his confrontation with the Muslims.
In fact, Fiennes traces the family roots to around 800 AD, to find that the primogenitor of the family tree was Charlemagne's grandfather, Charles Martel, Fiennes's great-to-the-power-of-41 grandfather.
Derbyshire dwells only on Islamic art and literature, and implies we would have been better off had Charles Martel lost the Battle of Tours in 722.
"It's a very sad commentary that there would be almost this embarrassment the church would feel by having to acknowledge it," says out psychotherapist Charles Martel, a project coordinator for the group Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry.
They had come from Morocco and up through Spain to enter the lush green valleys embracing the northern Mediterranean shore, and most were driven off by Charles Martel, grandfather of Charlemagne, but not all and those who remained, introduced the art of weaving here.
It was the brave Charles Martel and his small army of Frankish nobles who destroyed the superior forces of an invading Islamic army on the battlefield of Tours in 732AD.
The West will always owe a debt to Charles Martel's Franks, for turning back the Muslim invasion at Tours in 732.
Readers will enjoy the little historical gems tucked into the text, such as Charles Martel winning the Battle of Poitiers in 732, ending the advance of Islam into Europe, because he equipped his heavy cavalry with stirrups so they would be more difficult to unhorse.
The Carolingians held the office of " mayor of the palace " under the weak later Merovingian kings, but they were the virtual rulers, particularly Charles Martel (689?
An able and successful ruler despite his youth; the defeat of the Arabs before the walls of Constantinople was as important in saving Europe from Arab domination as was Charles Martel's later victory at Tours (722).
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