Charles III

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Charles III

, emperor of the West, king of the East Franks, and king of the West Franks
Charles III or Charles the Fat, 839–88, emperor of the West (881–87), king of the East Franks (882–87), and king of the West Franks (884–87); son of Louis the German, at whose death he inherited Swabia (876). He succeeded to the East Frankish or German kingship after the deaths of his brothers Carloman (880) and Louis the Younger (882), with whom he had shared the kingdom of Louis the German. He had also gained Italy from Carloman and was crowned emperor by Pope John VIII in 881. After the death of the heirs of Charles II in France, he became (884) West Frankish king, thus reuniting briefly the empire of Charlemagne. A weak ruler, he was unable to protect his lands from invasion and in 886, when he went to relieve Paris, which was besieged by the Norsemen, he ransomed the city instead of fighting and allowed the invaders to ravage Burgundy. He was deposed in 887 and was succeeded in Germany by Arnulf and briefly in France by Eudes.

Charles III

, 839–88, French king (Charles the Fat)
Charles III or Charles the Fat, French king: see Charles III, emperor of the West.

Charles III

, 879–929, French king (Charles the Simple)
Charles III (Charles the Simple), 879–929, French king (893–923), son of King Louis II (Louis the Stammerer). As a child he was excluded from the succession at the death (884) of his half-brother Carloman and at the deposition (887) of King Charles III (Charles the Fat), who succeeded Carloman. Instead, Eudes, count of Paris, succeeded Charles the Fat. In 893, however, Charles was crowned by a party of nobles and prelates and became sole king at the death of Eudes in 898. He put an end to Norse raids by the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte (911), ceding to the Norse leader Rollo part of the territory later known as Normandy, and in 911 Charles acquired Lorraine. In 922 some of the barons revolted and crowned Robert I, brother of Eudes, king. In 923, at the battle of Soissons, Robert was killed, but Charles was defeated. Raoul of Burgundy was elected king, and Charles was imprisoned.

Charles III

, king of Hungary
Charles III, king of Hungary: see Charles VI, Holy Roman emperor.

Charles III

, king of Naples
Charles III (Charles of Durazzo), 1345–86, king of Naples (1381–86) and, as Charles II, of Hungary (1385–86); great-grandson of Charles II of Naples. Adopted as a child by Joanna I of Naples, he later lived at the court of Louis I of Hungary. In 1380, Pope Urban VI summoned Charles to dethrone Joanna because of her support of the antipope, Clement IV; Joanna repudiated Charles as her heir in favor of Louis of Anjou (see Louis I, king of Naples). Charles conquered Naples, imprisoned Joanna, and was crowned (1381) by the pope. Joanna died by his order. Charles repulsed attacks on Naples by Louis of Anjou. In 1385, elected king of Hungary over Sigismund, Charles was crowned but was soon assassinated. He was succeeded in Naples by his son, Lancelot, and in Hungary by Sigismund.

Charles III

, king of Navarre
Charles III (Charles the Good), 1361–1425, king of Navarre (1387–1425), count of Évreux; son and successor of Charles II. He settled (1404) his inherited differences with France and later tried to negotiate between the Armagnacs and Burgundians. His reign was peaceful and beneficent. His daughter Blanche and her husband, John (later John II of Aragón), succeeded him.

Charles III

, king of Spain, and of Naples and Sicily
Charles III, 1716–88, king of Spain (1759–88) and of Naples and Sicily (1735–59), son of Philip V and Elizabeth Farnese. Recognized as duke of Parma and Piacenza in 1731, he relinquished the duchies to Austria after Spain reconquered (1734) Naples and Sicily in the War of the Polish Succession. His reign in Naples was beneficent. In 1759 he succeeded his half-brother, Ferdinand VI, to the Spanish throne, Naples and Sicily passing to his third son, Ferdinand (later Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies). Charles at first was neutral in the Seven Years War, but after concluding the Family Compact of 1761 with France, he involved Spain in the war in time to share France's defeat. By the Treaty of Paris of 1763 he ceded Florida to England but received Louisiana from France. Territorial disputes with Portugal in the Río de la Plata region were settled by the Treaty of San Ildefonso (1777). In the American Revolution, Charles entered (1779) the war on the American side and by the Treaty of Paris of 1783 regained Florida and Minorca. Spain prospered under the rule of Charles, who is regarded as the greatest Bourbon king of Spain and one of the “enlightened despots.” His reign is noted for economic and administrative reforms and for the expulsion of the Jesuits (1767). Charles was ably assisted by Aranda, Floridablanca, Campomanes, and Jovellanos. He was succeeded by his son Charles IV.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Charles III

 

(known as Charles the Fat). Born in 839; died Jan. 13, 888, in Neidingen. Ruler of the East Frankish and West Frankish kingdoms (876– and December 884–, respectively); king of all the East Franks (881–887).

Charles III was the son of Louis the German. He temporarily unified under his rule the territory of the former empire of Charlemagne. In 887 he was deposed by insurgent feudal lords.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Charles III

1. known as Charles the Fat. 839--888 ad, Holy Roman Emperor (881--887) and, as Charles II, king of France (884--887). He briefly reunited the empire of Charlemagne
2. 1716--88, king of Spain (1759--88), who curbed the power of the Church and tried to modernize his country
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
[with] a crowd of kings alike deserving of oblivion" to Roger Collins's late-twentieth-century observation "that it might be time someone stood up for Charles the Fat," MacLean provides a thoroughly judicious review of the historiography of his subject, which clearly justifies his modest observation after the Collins quote that his study is "a case for the defence" (1, 8-9).
West Frankish rulers like Charles the Fat and Louis the Stammerer in the ninth and tenth centuries struggled against the local warlords, while the Danes colonised Normandy and marauding Magyar horsemen from Hungary brought havoc and destruction as far west its Paris, Orleans and Tours.
It is, however, as many wise people have pointed out, the least worst system of government, beating anarchy (Year Zero in Cambodia, The Young Ones on BBC?) imperial rule (Nero, Genghis, Bokassa?) and monarchy (Mad King Ludwig, various Tarquins, George III and Charles the Fat - who may well have been all right, but I just like the name) straight into the proverbial cocked hat.